Functional connectivity of emotional processing in depression.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207863
Title:
Functional connectivity of emotional processing in depression.
Authors:
Carballedo, Angela; Scheuerecker, Johanna; Meisenzahl, Eva; Schoepf, Veronika; Bokde, Arun; Moller, Hans-Jurgen; Doyle, Myles; Wiesmann, Martin; Frodl, Thomas
Affiliation:
Discipline of Psychiatry, School of Medicine & Trinity College Institute of, Neuroscience, Integrated Neuroimaging, Trinity Academic Medical Centre, The, Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Children's Hospital, & St , James's Hospital, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. carbala@tcd.ie
Citation:
J Affect Disord. 2011 Nov;134(1-3):272-9. Epub 2011 Jul 14.
Journal:
Journal of affective disorders
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207863
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2011.06.021
PubMed ID:
21757239
Abstract:
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study is to map a neural network of emotion processing and to identify differences in major depression compared to healthy controls. It is hypothesized that intentional perception of emotional faces activates connections between amygdala (Demir et al.), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and that frontal-amygdala connections are altered in major depressive disorder (MDD). METHODS: Fifteen medication-free patients with MDD and fifteen healthy controls were enrolled. All subjects were assessed using the same face-matching functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) task, known to involve those areas. Brain activations were obtained using Statistical Parametric Mapping version 5 (SPM5) for data analysis and MARSBAR for extracting of fMRI time series. Then data was analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). RESULTS: A valid model was established for the left and the right hemispheres showing a circuit involving ACC, OFC, PFC and AMY. The left hemisphere shows significant lower connectivity strengths in patients than controls, for the pathway that goes from AMY to the OF11, and a trend of higher connectivity in patients for the path that goes from the PF9 to the OF11. In the right hemisphere, patients show lower connectivity coefficients in the paths from the AMY to OF11, from the AMY to ACC, and from the ACC to PF9. By the contrary, controls show lower connectivity strengths for the path that goes from ACC to AMY. CONCLUSIONS: Functional disconnection between limbic and frontal brain regions could be demonstrated using structural equation modeling. The interpretation of these findings could be that there is an emotional processing bias with disconnection bilaterally between amygdala to orbitofrontal cortices and in addition a right disconnection between amygdala and ACC as well as between ACC and prefrontal cortex possibly in line with a more prominent role for the right hemisphere in emotion processing.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Amygdala/pathology/physiopathology; Brain/pathology/physiology/*physiopathology; Brain Mapping; Case-Control Studies; Cerebral Cortex/pathology/physiopathology; Depression; Depressive Disorder, Major/pathology/*physiopathology; Emotions/*physiology; Female; Frontal Lobe/pathology/physiopathology; Gyrus Cinguli/pathology/physiopathology; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Middle Aged; Models, Theoretical; *Nerve Net; Prefrontal Cortex/pathology/physiopathology
ISSN:
1573-2517 (Electronic); 0165-0327 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarballedo, Angelaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorScheuerecker, Johannaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMeisenzahl, Evaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchoepf, Veronikaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBokde, Arunen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoller, Hans-Jurgenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Mylesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWiesmann, Martinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFrodl, Thomasen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:48:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:48:25Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:48:25Z-
dc.identifier.citationJ Affect Disord. 2011 Nov;134(1-3):272-9. Epub 2011 Jul 14.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1573-2517 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21757239en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jad.2011.06.021en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207863-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The aim of the study is to map a neural network of emotion processing and to identify differences in major depression compared to healthy controls. It is hypothesized that intentional perception of emotional faces activates connections between amygdala (Demir et al.), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and that frontal-amygdala connections are altered in major depressive disorder (MDD). METHODS: Fifteen medication-free patients with MDD and fifteen healthy controls were enrolled. All subjects were assessed using the same face-matching functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) task, known to involve those areas. Brain activations were obtained using Statistical Parametric Mapping version 5 (SPM5) for data analysis and MARSBAR for extracting of fMRI time series. Then data was analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). RESULTS: A valid model was established for the left and the right hemispheres showing a circuit involving ACC, OFC, PFC and AMY. The left hemisphere shows significant lower connectivity strengths in patients than controls, for the pathway that goes from AMY to the OF11, and a trend of higher connectivity in patients for the path that goes from the PF9 to the OF11. In the right hemisphere, patients show lower connectivity coefficients in the paths from the AMY to OF11, from the AMY to ACC, and from the ACC to PF9. By the contrary, controls show lower connectivity strengths for the path that goes from ACC to AMY. CONCLUSIONS: Functional disconnection between limbic and frontal brain regions could be demonstrated using structural equation modeling. The interpretation of these findings could be that there is an emotional processing bias with disconnection bilaterally between amygdala to orbitofrontal cortices and in addition a right disconnection between amygdala and ACC as well as between ACC and prefrontal cortex possibly in line with a more prominent role for the right hemisphere in emotion processing.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAmygdala/pathology/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshBrain/pathology/physiology/*physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshBrain Mappingen_GB
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshCerebral Cortex/pathology/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshDepressionen_GB
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder, Major/pathology/*physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshEmotions/*physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFrontal Lobe/pathology/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshGyrus Cinguli/pathology/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshModels, Theoreticalen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Nerve Neten_GB
dc.subject.meshPrefrontal Cortex/pathology/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.titleFunctional connectivity of emotional processing in depression.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDiscipline of Psychiatry, School of Medicine & Trinity College Institute of, Neuroscience, Integrated Neuroimaging, Trinity Academic Medical Centre, The, Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Children's Hospital, & St , James's Hospital, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. carbala@tcd.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of affective disordersen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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