Common variation in the vitamin D receptor gene and risk of inflammatory bowel disease in an Irish case-control study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207854
Title:
Common variation in the vitamin D receptor gene and risk of inflammatory bowel disease in an Irish case-control study.
Authors:
Hughes, David J; McManus, Ross; Neary, Paul; O'morain, Colm; O'sullivan, Maria
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Medicine, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011 Sep;23(9):807-12.
Journal:
European journal of gastroenterology & hepatology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207854
DOI:
10.1097/MEG.0b013e328349283e
PubMed ID:
21818054
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Vitamin D may protect against the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several preliminary studies in separate geographical locations suggest that these effects may be partly mediated by genetic variants of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). The data, however, are yet to be confirmed in large European cohorts. This study aimed to determine if common VDR polymorphisms affected IBD risk in an Irish population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was based on a cohort of 1359 Irish participants. Frequencies of the common VDR gene polymorphisms rs2228570 (FokI), rs1544410 (BsmI), rs7975232 (ApaI), and rs731236 (TaqI) were determined using allele-specific PCR in a case-control analysis of 660 patients with IBD and 699 controls. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between these variants and risk of IBD. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant effect observed on IBD risk for any of the four VDR polymorphisms tested. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed in susceptibility when the population was stratified by sex or IBD subtype (Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis). Notably, however, there was an increased risk observed for both IBD and ulcerative colitis associated with heterozygote carriage of the FokI allele that approached significance (OR=1.21, 95% CI=0.95-1.53, P=0.12 and OR=1.36, 95% CI=0.98-1.89, P=0.06, respectively), this merits further investigation. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that there is no major effect for common variation in the VDR gene alone on predisposition to IBD in the Irish population.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Alleles; Case-Control Studies; Colitis, Ulcerative/*genetics; Crohn Disease/*genetics; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Genotype; Humans; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Receptors, Calcitriol/*genetics
ISSN:
1473-5687 (Electronic); 0954-691X (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHughes, David Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, Rossen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNeary, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'morain, Colmen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'sullivan, Mariaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:48:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:48:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:48:08Z-
dc.identifier.citationEur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011 Sep;23(9):807-12.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1473-5687 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0954-691X (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21818054en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MEG.0b013e328349283een_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207854-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Vitamin D may protect against the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several preliminary studies in separate geographical locations suggest that these effects may be partly mediated by genetic variants of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). The data, however, are yet to be confirmed in large European cohorts. This study aimed to determine if common VDR polymorphisms affected IBD risk in an Irish population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was based on a cohort of 1359 Irish participants. Frequencies of the common VDR gene polymorphisms rs2228570 (FokI), rs1544410 (BsmI), rs7975232 (ApaI), and rs731236 (TaqI) were determined using allele-specific PCR in a case-control analysis of 660 patients with IBD and 699 controls. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between these variants and risk of IBD. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant effect observed on IBD risk for any of the four VDR polymorphisms tested. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed in susceptibility when the population was stratified by sex or IBD subtype (Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis). Notably, however, there was an increased risk observed for both IBD and ulcerative colitis associated with heterozygote carriage of the FokI allele that approached significance (OR=1.21, 95% CI=0.95-1.53, P=0.12 and OR=1.36, 95% CI=0.98-1.89, P=0.06, respectively), this merits further investigation. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that there is no major effect for common variation in the VDR gene alone on predisposition to IBD in the Irish population.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAllelesen_GB
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshColitis, Ulcerative/*geneticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshCrohn Disease/*geneticsen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Diseaseen_GB
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Single Nucleotideen_GB
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Calcitriol/*geneticsen_GB
dc.titleCommon variation in the vitamin D receptor gene and risk of inflammatory bowel disease in an Irish case-control study.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical Medicine, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of gastroenterology & hepatologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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