Living with an unfixable heart: a qualitative study exploring the experience of living with advanced heart failure.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207814
Title:
Living with an unfixable heart: a qualitative study exploring the experience of living with advanced heart failure.
Authors:
Ryan, Marie; Farrelly, Mary
Affiliation:
Clinical Nurse Specialist, Heart Failure, CResT Department, St. James Hospital,, Dublin 8, Ireland. meryan@stjames.ie
Citation:
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2009 Sep;8(3):223-31. Epub 2009 Mar 17.
Journal:
European journal of cardiovascular nursing : journal of the Working Group on, Cardiovascular Nursing of the European Society of Cardiology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207814
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejcnurse.2009.02.005
PubMed ID:
19297250
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Nurses working with patients with advanced heart failure need knowledge that will help us to help patients cope with their situations of chronic illness. However, our knowledge bank is deficient due to the scarcity of inquiry that takes the affected person's point of view as its central focus. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe patients' experiences of living with advanced heart failure. METHODS: The study sample (N=9) consisted of male (N=6) and female (N=3) patients with advanced (NYHA classes III-IV) heart failure. The design was qualitative and open unstructured interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim during 2006. RESULTS: Four main themes emerged: Living in the Shadow of Fear; Running on Empty; Living a Restricted life; and Battling the System. The experience of living with advanced heart failure was described as a fearful and tired sort of living characterised by escalating impotence and dependence. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that there may be an illogical but enduring ethos of 'cure' pervading health care worker's attitudes to advanced heart failure care. This mindset might be working to hinder the application of additional or alternative therapies, which might better palliate the physical and psychosocial distress of patients.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
*Adaptation, Psychological; Affective Symptoms/nursing/psychology; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Attitude to Health; Depression/nursing/psychology; Fear/psychology; Female; Heart Failure/*nursing/*psychology; Helplessness, Learned; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Nursing Methodology Research; Palliative Care/*methods/psychology; Severity of Illness Index; Social Support
ISSN:
1873-1953 (Electronic); 1474-5151 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Marieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFarrelly, Maryen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:45:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:45:28Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:45:28Z-
dc.identifier.citationEur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2009 Sep;8(3):223-31. Epub 2009 Mar 17.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1873-1953 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1474-5151 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19297250en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejcnurse.2009.02.005en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207814-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Nurses working with patients with advanced heart failure need knowledge that will help us to help patients cope with their situations of chronic illness. However, our knowledge bank is deficient due to the scarcity of inquiry that takes the affected person's point of view as its central focus. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe patients' experiences of living with advanced heart failure. METHODS: The study sample (N=9) consisted of male (N=6) and female (N=3) patients with advanced (NYHA classes III-IV) heart failure. The design was qualitative and open unstructured interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim during 2006. RESULTS: Four main themes emerged: Living in the Shadow of Fear; Running on Empty; Living a Restricted life; and Battling the System. The experience of living with advanced heart failure was described as a fearful and tired sort of living characterised by escalating impotence and dependence. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that there may be an illogical but enduring ethos of 'cure' pervading health care worker's attitudes to advanced heart failure care. This mindset might be working to hinder the application of additional or alternative therapies, which might better palliate the physical and psychosocial distress of patients.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Adaptation, Psychologicalen_GB
dc.subject.meshAffective Symptoms/nursing/psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Attitude to Healthen_GB
dc.subject.meshDepression/nursing/psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFear/psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHeart Failure/*nursing/*psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHelplessness, Learneden_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshNursing Methodology Researchen_GB
dc.subject.meshPalliative Care/*methods/psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_GB
dc.titleLiving with an unfixable heart: a qualitative study exploring the experience of living with advanced heart failure.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentClinical Nurse Specialist, Heart Failure, CResT Department, St. James Hospital,, Dublin 8, Ireland. meryan@stjames.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of cardiovascular nursing : journal of the Working Group on, Cardiovascular Nursing of the European Society of Cardiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.