Symposium 6: Young people, artificial nutrition and transitional care. The nutritional challenges of the young adult with cystic fibrosis: transition.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207800
Title:
Symposium 6: Young people, artificial nutrition and transitional care. The nutritional challenges of the young adult with cystic fibrosis: transition.
Authors:
Morton, Alison M
Affiliation:
Adult Cystic Fibrosis Unit and Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, St James', Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds LS9 7TF, UK. Alison.morton@leedsth.nhs.uk
Citation:
Proc Nutr Soc. 2009 Nov;68(4):430-40. Epub 2009 Aug 24.
Journal:
The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207800
DOI:
10.1017/S0029665109990176
PubMed ID:
19698200
Abstract:
Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a complex multisystem disorder affecting mainly the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory system. Intestinal malabsorption occurs in approximately 90% of patients. In the past, malnutrition was an inevitable consequence of disease progression, leading to poor growth, impaired respiratory muscle function, decreased exercise tolerance and immunological impairment. A positive association between body weight and height and survival has been widely reported. The energy requirements of patients with CF vary widely and generally increase with age and disease severity. For many young adults requirements will be 120-150% of the age-related estimated average requirement. To meet these energy needs patients are encouraged to eat a high-fat high-energy diet with appropriate pancreatic enzyme supplements. Many patients are unable to achieve an adequate intake as a result of a variety of factors including chronic poor appetite, infection-related anorexia, gastro-oesophageal reflux and abdominal pain. Oral energy supplements and enteral tube feeding are widely used. Nutritional support has been shown to improve nutritional status and stabilise or slow the rate of decline in lung function. With such emphasis on nutritional intake and nutritional status throughout life, poor adherence to therapies and issues relating to body image are emerging. The median survival of patients with CF is increasing. CF is now considered a life-limiting disease of adulthood rather than a terminal childhood illness. With increased longevity new challenges are emerging that include the transition of young adults with CF to adult services, CF-related diabetes, disordered eating, osteoporosis, liver disease and transplantation.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Child; Continuity of Patient Care; Cystic Fibrosis/complications/*diet therapy; Energy Intake; Enteral Nutrition; Female; Humans; Male; Malnutrition/*prevention & control; Nutritional Requirements; Nutritional Status; Vitamins/therapeutic use; Young Adult
ISSN:
0029-6651 (Print); 0029-6651 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorton, Alison Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:45:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:45:05Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:45:05Z-
dc.identifier.citationProc Nutr Soc. 2009 Nov;68(4):430-40. Epub 2009 Aug 24.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0029-6651 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0029-6651 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19698200en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0029665109990176en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207800-
dc.description.abstractCystic fibrosis (CF) is a complex multisystem disorder affecting mainly the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory system. Intestinal malabsorption occurs in approximately 90% of patients. In the past, malnutrition was an inevitable consequence of disease progression, leading to poor growth, impaired respiratory muscle function, decreased exercise tolerance and immunological impairment. A positive association between body weight and height and survival has been widely reported. The energy requirements of patients with CF vary widely and generally increase with age and disease severity. For many young adults requirements will be 120-150% of the age-related estimated average requirement. To meet these energy needs patients are encouraged to eat a high-fat high-energy diet with appropriate pancreatic enzyme supplements. Many patients are unable to achieve an adequate intake as a result of a variety of factors including chronic poor appetite, infection-related anorexia, gastro-oesophageal reflux and abdominal pain. Oral energy supplements and enteral tube feeding are widely used. Nutritional support has been shown to improve nutritional status and stabilise or slow the rate of decline in lung function. With such emphasis on nutritional intake and nutritional status throughout life, poor adherence to therapies and issues relating to body image are emerging. The median survival of patients with CF is increasing. CF is now considered a life-limiting disease of adulthood rather than a terminal childhood illness. With increased longevity new challenges are emerging that include the transition of young adults with CF to adult services, CF-related diabetes, disordered eating, osteoporosis, liver disease and transplantation.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshContinuity of Patient Careen_GB
dc.subject.meshCystic Fibrosis/complications/*diet therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshEnergy Intakeen_GB
dc.subject.meshEnteral Nutritionen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMalnutrition/*prevention & controlen_GB
dc.subject.meshNutritional Requirementsen_GB
dc.subject.meshNutritional Statusen_GB
dc.subject.meshVitamins/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleSymposium 6: Young people, artificial nutrition and transitional care. The nutritional challenges of the young adult with cystic fibrosis: transition.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAdult Cystic Fibrosis Unit and Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, St James', Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds LS9 7TF, UK. Alison.morton@leedsth.nhs.uken_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Proceedings of the Nutrition Societyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.