Self-administered outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: a report of three years experience in the Irish healthcare setting.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207797
Title:
Self-administered outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: a report of three years experience in the Irish healthcare setting.
Authors:
Kieran, J; O'Reilly, A; Parker, J; Clarke, S; Bergin, C
Affiliation:
Department of Genitourinary Medicine and Infectious Diseases, St. James Hospital,, Dublin 8, Ireland. jkieran2@stjames.ie
Citation:
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2009 Nov;28(11):1369-74. Epub 2009 Aug 21.
Journal:
European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official, publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207797
DOI:
10.1007/s10096-009-0794-5
PubMed ID:
19697069
Abstract:
Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) was first reported in 1972. OPAT programmes are not well established in Ireland, with no reported outcomes in the literature. An OPAT programme was established at St. James Hospital in 2006. Demographics, diagnoses and outcomes of the first 60 courses are reported. A retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data was performed on patients treated from March 2006 to February 2009. The data was analysed using SPSS v.17. Sixty OPAT courses were administered to 56 patients, 57 percent of which were male. The median age was 50 years, the median inpatient stay was 19 days, the median duration of OPAT was 16 days and 1,289 inpatient bed days were saved. The additional cost per day of OPAT was 167.60 euros. Vancomycin was the most prescribed antimicrobial, administered to 35%. Musculoskeletal infection was the indication for treatment in 50%. Confirmatory microbiological diagnosis was identified in 72%, most frequently due to Staphylococcus aureus (68%). Only minor adverse events were recorded. Clinical cure was achieved in 92.8%. A patient satisfaction survey showed high satisfaction. OPAT is a safe and effective way of providing parenteral antibiotic therapy in the Irish healthcare system. Better integration of funding and the appointment of Infectious Diseases specialists will facilitate its expansion.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents/*administration & dosage/adverse effects/*therapeutic use; Bacterial Infections/*drug therapy; Female; *Health Services Research; Humans; *Infusions, Intravenous; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; Outpatients; Prospective Studies; Self Administration/*methods; Treatment Outcome; Young Adult
ISSN:
1435-4373 (Electronic); 0934-9723 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKieran, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorParker, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBergin, Cen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:44:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:44:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:44:59Z-
dc.identifier.citationEur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2009 Nov;28(11):1369-74. Epub 2009 Aug 21.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1435-4373 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0934-9723 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19697069en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10096-009-0794-5en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207797-
dc.description.abstractOutpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) was first reported in 1972. OPAT programmes are not well established in Ireland, with no reported outcomes in the literature. An OPAT programme was established at St. James Hospital in 2006. Demographics, diagnoses and outcomes of the first 60 courses are reported. A retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data was performed on patients treated from March 2006 to February 2009. The data was analysed using SPSS v.17. Sixty OPAT courses were administered to 56 patients, 57 percent of which were male. The median age was 50 years, the median inpatient stay was 19 days, the median duration of OPAT was 16 days and 1,289 inpatient bed days were saved. The additional cost per day of OPAT was 167.60 euros. Vancomycin was the most prescribed antimicrobial, administered to 35%. Musculoskeletal infection was the indication for treatment in 50%. Confirmatory microbiological diagnosis was identified in 72%, most frequently due to Staphylococcus aureus (68%). Only minor adverse events were recorded. Clinical cure was achieved in 92.8%. A patient satisfaction survey showed high satisfaction. OPAT is a safe and effective way of providing parenteral antibiotic therapy in the Irish healthcare system. Better integration of funding and the appointment of Infectious Diseases specialists will facilitate its expansion.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents/*administration & dosage/adverse effects/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshBacterial Infections/*drug therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Health Services Researchen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Infusions, Intravenousen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshOutpatientsen_GB
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSelf Administration/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleSelf-administered outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: a report of three years experience in the Irish healthcare setting.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Genitourinary Medicine and Infectious Diseases, St. James Hospital,, Dublin 8, Ireland. jkieran2@stjames.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official, publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-
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