Long-term health-related quality of life for disease-free esophageal cancer patients.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207795
Title:
Long-term health-related quality of life for disease-free esophageal cancer patients.
Authors:
Donohoe, Claire L; McGillycuddy, Erin; Reynolds, John V
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Trinity College Dublin/St James' Hospital, Trinity Centre , for Health Sciences, St James' Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland.
Citation:
World J Surg. 2011 Aug;35(8):1853-60.
Journal:
World journal of surgery
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207795
DOI:
10.1007/s00268-011-1123-6
PubMed ID:
21553202
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Health-related quality of life (HRQL) has been studied extensively during the first year following esophagectomy, but little is known about HRQL in long-term survivors. The aim of this study was to investigate HRQL in patients alive at least 1 year after surgical resection for esophageal cancer using validated European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life (QOL) questionnaires (QLQ). METHODS: Eligible patients, without known disease recurrence and at least 1 year after esophagectomy, were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Patients completed general (QLQ-C30) and esophageal cancer-specific (QLQ-OES18, OG25) questionnaires. A numeric score (0-100) was computed in each conceptual area and compared with validated cancer (n = 1031) and age-matched (n = 7802) healthy populations using two-tailed unpaired t-tests. A cohort of 80 patients had pretreatment scores recorded. RESULTS: Altogether, 132 of 156 eligible patients (84%) completed the self-rated questionnaire, 105 (67.3%) were men, and the mean age was 62 years (range 29-84 years). The mean time since esophagectomy was 70.3 months (12-299 months). Global health status was significantly reduced at least 1 year after esophagectomy (mean +/- SD score 48.4 +/- 18.6) when compared with patients with esophageal cancer prior to treatment (55.6 +/- 24.1) and the general population (71.2 +/- 22.4) (p < 0.0001). In a prospective cohort of eighty patients, symptoms related to swallowing difficulty, reflux, pain, and coughing significantly decreased in the long term (p < 0.0001). The degree of subjective swallowing dysfunction was highly correlated with a poor QOL (Spearman's rho = 0.508, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Global health status remains significantly reduced in long-term survivors after esophagectomy compared with population controls, and swallowing dysfunction is highly associated with this compromised QOL.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Aged; Cohort Studies; Esophageal Neoplasms/*psychology/*surgery; Esophagectomy/*psychology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; Postoperative Complications/psychology; Prospective Studies; Quality of Life/*psychology; Questionnaires; Survivors/*psychology
ISSN:
1432-2323 (Electronic); 0364-2313 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDonohoe, Claire Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGillycuddy, Erinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, John Ven_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:44:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:44:56Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:44:56Z-
dc.identifier.citationWorld J Surg. 2011 Aug;35(8):1853-60.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1432-2323 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0364-2313 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21553202en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00268-011-1123-6en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207795-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Health-related quality of life (HRQL) has been studied extensively during the first year following esophagectomy, but little is known about HRQL in long-term survivors. The aim of this study was to investigate HRQL in patients alive at least 1 year after surgical resection for esophageal cancer using validated European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life (QOL) questionnaires (QLQ). METHODS: Eligible patients, without known disease recurrence and at least 1 year after esophagectomy, were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Patients completed general (QLQ-C30) and esophageal cancer-specific (QLQ-OES18, OG25) questionnaires. A numeric score (0-100) was computed in each conceptual area and compared with validated cancer (n = 1031) and age-matched (n = 7802) healthy populations using two-tailed unpaired t-tests. A cohort of 80 patients had pretreatment scores recorded. RESULTS: Altogether, 132 of 156 eligible patients (84%) completed the self-rated questionnaire, 105 (67.3%) were men, and the mean age was 62 years (range 29-84 years). The mean time since esophagectomy was 70.3 months (12-299 months). Global health status was significantly reduced at least 1 year after esophagectomy (mean +/- SD score 48.4 +/- 18.6) when compared with patients with esophageal cancer prior to treatment (55.6 +/- 24.1) and the general population (71.2 +/- 22.4) (p < 0.0001). In a prospective cohort of eighty patients, symptoms related to swallowing difficulty, reflux, pain, and coughing significantly decreased in the long term (p < 0.0001). The degree of subjective swallowing dysfunction was highly correlated with a poor QOL (Spearman's rho = 0.508, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Global health status remains significantly reduced in long-term survivors after esophagectomy compared with population controls, and swallowing dysfunction is highly associated with this compromised QOL.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshEsophageal Neoplasms/*psychology/*surgeryen_GB
dc.subject.meshEsophagectomy/*psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complications/psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life/*psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSurvivors/*psychologyen_GB
dc.titleLong-term health-related quality of life for disease-free esophageal cancer patients.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Trinity College Dublin/St James' Hospital, Trinity Centre , for Health Sciences, St James' Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalWorld journal of surgeryen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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