Severe maternal morbidity for 2004-2005 in the three Dublin maternity hospitals.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207730
Title:
Severe maternal morbidity for 2004-2005 in the three Dublin maternity hospitals.
Authors:
Murphy, Cliona M; Murad, Khulood; Deane, Richard; Byrne, Bridgette; Geary, Michael P; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M
Affiliation:
Rotunda Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2009 Mar;143(1):34-7. Epub 2009 Jan 12.
Journal:
European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207730
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejogrb.2008.11.008
PubMed ID:
19136192
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence and causes of severe maternal morbidity in Dublin over a two year period from 2004 to 2005. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study from January 2004 to December 2005 was undertaken in the three large maternity hospitals in Dublin, which serve a population of 1.5 million people. All are tertiary referral centres for obstetrics and neonatology and have an annual combined delivery rate of circa 23,000 births. Cases of severe maternal morbidity were identified. A systems based classification was used. The primary cause of maternal morbidity and the number of events experienced per patient was recorded. RESULTS: We identified 158 women who fulfilled the definition for severe maternal morbidity, giving a rate of 3.2 per 1000 maternities. There were two maternal deaths during the time period giving mortality to morbidity ratio of 1:79. The commonest cause of severe morbidity was vascular dysfunction related to obstetric haemorrhage. Eclampsia comprised 15.4% of cases. Intensive care or coronary care admission occurred in 12% of cases. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of severe maternal morbidity in this population is 3.2/1000 maternities. Obstetric haemorrhage was the main cause of severe maternal morbidity.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Coronary Care Units/statistics & numerical data; Eclampsia/epidemiology; Female; Hospitals, Maternity/*statistics & numerical data; Humans; Hysterectomy/statistics & numerical data; Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data; Ireland/epidemiology; Maternal Mortality; Postpartum Hemorrhage/*epidemiology; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/epidemiology; Prevalence; Prospective Studies
ISSN:
1872-7654 (Electronic); 0301-2115 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Cliona Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurad, Khulooden_GB
dc.contributor.authorDeane, Richarden_GB
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Bridgetteen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGeary, Michael Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcAuliffe, Fionnuala Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:38:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:38:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:38:15Z-
dc.identifier.citationEur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2009 Mar;143(1):34-7. Epub 2009 Jan 12.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1872-7654 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0301-2115 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19136192en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejogrb.2008.11.008en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207730-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence and causes of severe maternal morbidity in Dublin over a two year period from 2004 to 2005. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study from January 2004 to December 2005 was undertaken in the three large maternity hospitals in Dublin, which serve a population of 1.5 million people. All are tertiary referral centres for obstetrics and neonatology and have an annual combined delivery rate of circa 23,000 births. Cases of severe maternal morbidity were identified. A systems based classification was used. The primary cause of maternal morbidity and the number of events experienced per patient was recorded. RESULTS: We identified 158 women who fulfilled the definition for severe maternal morbidity, giving a rate of 3.2 per 1000 maternities. There were two maternal deaths during the time period giving mortality to morbidity ratio of 1:79. The commonest cause of severe morbidity was vascular dysfunction related to obstetric haemorrhage. Eclampsia comprised 15.4% of cases. Intensive care or coronary care admission occurred in 12% of cases. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of severe maternal morbidity in this population is 3.2/1000 maternities. Obstetric haemorrhage was the main cause of severe maternal morbidity.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshCoronary Care Units/statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshEclampsia/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Maternity/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshHysterectomy/statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Units/statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshIreland/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaternal Mortalityen_GB
dc.subject.meshPostpartum Hemorrhage/*epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_GB
dc.titleSevere maternal morbidity for 2004-2005 in the three Dublin maternity hospitals.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentRotunda Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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