Continuous positive airway pressure therapy: new generations.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207648
Title:
Continuous positive airway pressure therapy: new generations.
Authors:
Garvey, John F; McNicholas, Walter T
Affiliation:
Sleep Research Laboratory, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland., john.garvey@ucd.ie
Citation:
Indian J Med Res. 2010 Feb;131:259-66.
Journal:
The Indian journal of medical research
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207648
PubMed ID:
20308751
Abstract:
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, CPAP is not tolerated by all patients with OSAS and alternative modes of pressure delivery have been developed to overcome pressure intolerance, thereby improving patient comfort and adherence. Auto-adjustable positive airway pressure (APAP) devices may be utilised for the long-term management of OSAS and may also assist in the initial diagnosis of OSAS and titration of conventional CPAP therapy. Newer modalities such as C-Flex and A-Flex also show promise as treatment options in the future. However, the evidence supporting the use of these alternative modalities remains scant, in particular with regard to long-term cardiovascular outcomes. In addition, not all APAP devices use the same technological algorithms and data supporting individual APAP devices cannot be extrapolated to support all. Further studies are required to validate the roles of APAP, C-Flex and A-Flex. In the interim, standard CPAP therapy should continue as the mainstay of OSAS management.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Algorithms; Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy; Continuous Positive Airway Pressure/instrumentation/*methods; Equipment Design; Humans; Positive-Pressure Respiration/instrumentation; Quality of Life; Research/trends; Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/pathology/*therapy; Treatment Outcome
ISSN:
0971-5916 (Print)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGarvey, John Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcNicholas, Walter Ten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:33:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:33:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:33:54Z-
dc.identifier.citationIndian J Med Res. 2010 Feb;131:259-66.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0971-5916 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20308751en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207648-
dc.description.abstractContinuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, CPAP is not tolerated by all patients with OSAS and alternative modes of pressure delivery have been developed to overcome pressure intolerance, thereby improving patient comfort and adherence. Auto-adjustable positive airway pressure (APAP) devices may be utilised for the long-term management of OSAS and may also assist in the initial diagnosis of OSAS and titration of conventional CPAP therapy. Newer modalities such as C-Flex and A-Flex also show promise as treatment options in the future. However, the evidence supporting the use of these alternative modalities remains scant, in particular with regard to long-term cardiovascular outcomes. In addition, not all APAP devices use the same technological algorithms and data supporting individual APAP devices cannot be extrapolated to support all. Further studies are required to validate the roles of APAP, C-Flex and A-Flex. In the interim, standard CPAP therapy should continue as the mainstay of OSAS management.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAlgorithmsen_GB
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases/therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshContinuous Positive Airway Pressure/instrumentation/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshEquipment Designen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshPositive-Pressure Respiration/instrumentationen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuality of Lifeen_GB
dc.subject.meshResearch/trendsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructive/pathology/*therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_GB
dc.titleContinuous positive airway pressure therapy: new generations.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentSleep Research Laboratory, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland., john.garvey@ucd.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Indian journal of medical researchen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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