Effects of salmeterol on sleeping oxygen saturation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207642
Title:
Effects of salmeterol on sleeping oxygen saturation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Authors:
Ryan, Silke; Doherty, Liam S; Rock, Clare; Nolan, Geraldine M; McNicholas, Walter T
Affiliation:
Sleep Research Laboratory, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Respiration. 2010;79(6):475-81. Epub 2009 Aug 14.
Journal:
Respiration; international review of thoracic diseases
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207642
DOI:
10.1159/000235619
PubMed ID:
19684384
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Sleep is associated with important adverse effects in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), such as disturbed sleep quality and gas exchange, including hypoxemia and hypercapnia. The effects of inhaled long-acting beta(2)-agonist therapy (LABA) on these disturbances are unclear. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to assess the effect of inhaled salmeterol on nocturnal sleeping arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) and sleep quality. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of moderate/severe stable COPD patients, we compared the effects of 4 weeks of treatment with salmeterol 50 microg b.d. and matching placebo on sleeping SaO(2) and sleep quality. Overnight polysomnography (PSG) was performed at baseline, and after 4 and 8 weeks in addition to detailed pulmonary function testing. Of 15 patients included, 12 completed the trial (median age 69 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, FEV(1): 39%). RESULTS: Both mean SaO(2) [salmeterol vs. placebo: 92.9% (91.2, 94.7) vs. 91.0% (88.9, 94.8); p = 0.016] and the percentage of sleep spent below 90% of SaO(2) [1.8% (0.0, 10.8) vs. 25.6% (0.5, 53.5); p = 0.005] improved significantly with salmeterol. Sleep quality was similar with both salmeterol and placebo on PSG. Static lung volumes, particularly trapped gas volume, tended to improve with salmeterol. CONCLUSION: We conclude that inhaled LABA therapy improves sleeping SaO(2) without significant change in sleep quality.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Administration, Inhalation; Adrenergic beta-Agonists/*administration & dosage; Aged; Albuterol/administration & dosage/*analogs & derivatives; Bronchodilator Agents/*administration & dosage; Cross-Over Studies; Double-Blind Method; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume; Humans; Lung Volume Measurements; Male; Middle Aged; Oxygen/*blood; Polysomnography; Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*blood/drug therapy/physiopathology; *Sleep; Spirometry
ISSN:
1423-0356 (Electronic); 0025-7931 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Silkeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoherty, Liam Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRock, Clareen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Geraldine Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcNicholas, Walter Ten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:33:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:33:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:33:43Z-
dc.identifier.citationRespiration. 2010;79(6):475-81. Epub 2009 Aug 14.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1423-0356 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0025-7931 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19684384en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000235619en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207642-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Sleep is associated with important adverse effects in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), such as disturbed sleep quality and gas exchange, including hypoxemia and hypercapnia. The effects of inhaled long-acting beta(2)-agonist therapy (LABA) on these disturbances are unclear. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to assess the effect of inhaled salmeterol on nocturnal sleeping arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) and sleep quality. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of moderate/severe stable COPD patients, we compared the effects of 4 weeks of treatment with salmeterol 50 microg b.d. and matching placebo on sleeping SaO(2) and sleep quality. Overnight polysomnography (PSG) was performed at baseline, and after 4 and 8 weeks in addition to detailed pulmonary function testing. Of 15 patients included, 12 completed the trial (median age 69 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, FEV(1): 39%). RESULTS: Both mean SaO(2) [salmeterol vs. placebo: 92.9% (91.2, 94.7) vs. 91.0% (88.9, 94.8); p = 0.016] and the percentage of sleep spent below 90% of SaO(2) [1.8% (0.0, 10.8) vs. 25.6% (0.5, 53.5); p = 0.005] improved significantly with salmeterol. Sleep quality was similar with both salmeterol and placebo on PSG. Static lung volumes, particularly trapped gas volume, tended to improve with salmeterol. CONCLUSION: We conclude that inhaled LABA therapy improves sleeping SaO(2) without significant change in sleep quality.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdministration, Inhalationen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdrenergic beta-Agonists/*administration & dosageen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAlbuterol/administration & dosage/*analogs & derivativesen_GB
dc.subject.meshBronchodilator Agents/*administration & dosageen_GB
dc.subject.meshCross-Over Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshDouble-Blind Methoden_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshForced Expiratory Volumeen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshLung Volume Measurementsen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshOxygen/*blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshPolysomnographyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Diffusing Capacityen_GB
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*blood/drug therapy/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Sleepen_GB
dc.subject.meshSpirometryen_GB
dc.titleEffects of salmeterol on sleeping oxygen saturation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentSleep Research Laboratory, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalRespiration; international review of thoracic diseasesen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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