CT colonography and transient bacteraemia: implications for antibiotic prophylaxis.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207630
Title:
CT colonography and transient bacteraemia: implications for antibiotic prophylaxis.
Authors:
Ridge, C A; Carter, M R; Browne, L P; Ryan, R; Hegarty, C; Schaffer, K; Malone, D E
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland., caroleridge@hotmail.com
Citation:
Eur Radiol. 2011 Feb;21(2):360-5. Epub 2010 Aug 15.
Journal:
European radiology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207630
DOI:
10.1007/s00330-010-1933-1
PubMed ID:
20711729
Abstract:
OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CT colonography (CTC). METHODS: Blood cultures were obtained at 5, 10 and 15 min after CTC from 100 consecutive consenting patients. Blood samples were cultured in both aerobic and anaerobic media and positive blood culture samples were analysed by a microbiologist. RESULTS: Blood culture samples were positive for growth in sixteen patients. All positive blood culture samples were confirmed skin contaminants. There were no cases of significant bacteraemia. The estimated significant bacteraemia rate as a result of CTC is 0-3.7%, based on 95% confidence intervals around extreme results using Wilson's score method. CONCLUSIONS: American Heart Association and National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines advise that antibiotic prophylaxis before lower gastrointestinal endoscopy is not indicated in patients with at risk cardiac lesions (ARCL) as the risk of a transient bacteraemia leading to infective endocarditis is low. These data show that the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CTC is also low. It follows that patients with ARCL do not require antibiotic prophylaxis before CTC.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents/*therapeutic use; Bacteremia/*epidemiology/*prevention & control; Colonography, Computed Tomographic/*statistics & numerical data; Female; Humans; Incidence; Ireland/epidemiology; Male; Middle Aged; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors
ISSN:
1432-1084 (Electronic); 0938-7994 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRidge, C Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarter, M Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, L Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorHegarty, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchaffer, Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorMalone, D Een_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:33:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:33:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:33:22Z-
dc.identifier.citationEur Radiol. 2011 Feb;21(2):360-5. Epub 2010 Aug 15.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1432-1084 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0938-7994 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20711729en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00330-010-1933-1en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207630-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CT colonography (CTC). METHODS: Blood cultures were obtained at 5, 10 and 15 min after CTC from 100 consecutive consenting patients. Blood samples were cultured in both aerobic and anaerobic media and positive blood culture samples were analysed by a microbiologist. RESULTS: Blood culture samples were positive for growth in sixteen patients. All positive blood culture samples were confirmed skin contaminants. There were no cases of significant bacteraemia. The estimated significant bacteraemia rate as a result of CTC is 0-3.7%, based on 95% confidence intervals around extreme results using Wilson's score method. CONCLUSIONS: American Heart Association and National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines advise that antibiotic prophylaxis before lower gastrointestinal endoscopy is not indicated in patients with at risk cardiac lesions (ARCL) as the risk of a transient bacteraemia leading to infective endocarditis is low. These data show that the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CTC is also low. It follows that patients with ARCL do not require antibiotic prophylaxis before CTC.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshBacteremia/*epidemiology/*prevention & controlen_GB
dc.subject.meshColonography, Computed Tomographic/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshIreland/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.titleCT colonography and transient bacteraemia: implications for antibiotic prophylaxis.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland., caroleridge@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean radiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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