Noncardiac findings on cardiac CT part I: Pros and cons.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207613
Title:
Noncardiac findings on cardiac CT part I: Pros and cons.
Authors:
Killeen, Ronan P; Dodd, Jonathan D; Cury, Ricardo C
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin 4, Ireland.
Citation:
J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr. 2009 Sep-Oct;3(5):293-9. Epub 2009 May 13.
Journal:
Journal of cardiovascular computed tomography
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207613
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcct.2009.05.003
PubMed ID:
19556177
Abstract:
Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has evolved into an effective imaging technique for the evaluation of coronary artery disease in selected patients. Two distinct advantages over other noninvasive imaging modalities include its ability to evaluate directly the coronary arteries and to provide an opportunity to evaluate extracardiac structures, such as the lungs and mediastinum. Some centers reconstruct a small field of view (FOV) cropped around the heart, but a full FOV (from skin to skin in the irradiated area) is obtainable in the raw data of every scan so that clinically relevant noncardiac findings are identifiable. Debate in the scientific community has centered on the necessity for this large FOV evaluation. A review of noncardiac structures provides the opportunity to make alternative diagnoses that may account for the patient's presentation or to detect important but clinically silent problems such as lung cancer. Critics argue that the yield of biopsy-proven cancers is low and that the follow-up of incidental noncardiac findings is expensive, resulting in increased radiation exposure and possibly unnecessary further testing. In this two-part review we outline the issues surrounding the concept of the noncardiac read looking for noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part I focuses on the pros and cons of the practice of identifying noncardiac findings on cardiac CT.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Heart Diseases/*radiography; Humans; *Incidental Findings; Lung Diseases/*radiography; Radiography, Abdominal/*methods/*trends; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods/*trends
ISSN:
1876-861X (Electronic); 1876-861X (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKilleen, Ronan Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Jonathan Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorCury, Ricardo Cen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:32:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:32:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:32:53Z-
dc.identifier.citationJ Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr. 2009 Sep-Oct;3(5):293-9. Epub 2009 May 13.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1876-861X (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1876-861X (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19556177en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jcct.2009.05.003en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207613-
dc.description.abstractCardiac computed tomography (CT) has evolved into an effective imaging technique for the evaluation of coronary artery disease in selected patients. Two distinct advantages over other noninvasive imaging modalities include its ability to evaluate directly the coronary arteries and to provide an opportunity to evaluate extracardiac structures, such as the lungs and mediastinum. Some centers reconstruct a small field of view (FOV) cropped around the heart, but a full FOV (from skin to skin in the irradiated area) is obtainable in the raw data of every scan so that clinically relevant noncardiac findings are identifiable. Debate in the scientific community has centered on the necessity for this large FOV evaluation. A review of noncardiac structures provides the opportunity to make alternative diagnoses that may account for the patient's presentation or to detect important but clinically silent problems such as lung cancer. Critics argue that the yield of biopsy-proven cancers is low and that the follow-up of incidental noncardiac findings is expensive, resulting in increased radiation exposure and possibly unnecessary further testing. In this two-part review we outline the issues surrounding the concept of the noncardiac read looking for noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part I focuses on the pros and cons of the practice of identifying noncardiac findings on cardiac CT.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshHeart Diseases/*radiographyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Incidental Findingsen_GB
dc.subject.meshLung Diseases/*radiographyen_GB
dc.subject.meshRadiography, Abdominal/*methods/*trendsen_GB
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods/*trendsen_GB
dc.titleNoncardiac findings on cardiac CT part I: Pros and cons.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin 4, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of cardiovascular computed tomographyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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