The "flying" bile duct: avulsion of the common bile duct in a plane crash survivor.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207547
Title:
The "flying" bile duct: avulsion of the common bile duct in a plane crash survivor.
Authors:
Mohan, H; Beddy, D; Latif, A; Bangash, T; Quill, D; Traynor, O
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland., eibhlinmohan@hotmail.com
Citation:
Ir J Med Sci. 2009 Dec;178(4):523-5.
Journal:
Irish journal of medical science
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207547
DOI:
10.1007/s11845-008-0225-0
PubMed ID:
18839268
Abstract:
Blunt trauma is an unusual cause of extrahepatic bile duct injury. This is a case of a 51-year-old gentleman who sustained a significant seatbelt injury in a plane crash. Laparotomy, performed due to persistent abdominal pain, revealed that the common bile duct (CBD) was completely avulsed from the duodenum. Following insertion of drains and transfer to a hepatobiliary centre, the devascularised CBD was excised and replaced with a roux-en-y hepaticojejunostomy. Necrotic tissue was debrided from the pancreatic head. A persistent bile leak developed from the sub-hepatic drain. Repeat laparotomy revealed a bile leak from small ducts on the liver surface. Ligation of the ducts and bioglue sealing of the area were successfully performed. Subsequent to this a pancreatic fistula developed from the main pancreatic duct, which has since resolved. This unusual case illustrates the need for prompt recognition and early repair to optimise outcomes in traumatic CBD injury.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
*Accidents, Aviation; Common Bile Duct/*injuries; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Wounds, Nonpenetrating/*complications/*surgery
ISSN:
1863-4362 (Electronic); 0021-1265 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMohan, Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeddy, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorLatif, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBangash, Ten_GB
dc.contributor.authorQuill, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorTraynor, Oen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:30:58Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:30:58Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:30:58Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr J Med Sci. 2009 Dec;178(4):523-5.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1863-4362 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0021-1265 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid18839268en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-008-0225-0en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207547-
dc.description.abstractBlunt trauma is an unusual cause of extrahepatic bile duct injury. This is a case of a 51-year-old gentleman who sustained a significant seatbelt injury in a plane crash. Laparotomy, performed due to persistent abdominal pain, revealed that the common bile duct (CBD) was completely avulsed from the duodenum. Following insertion of drains and transfer to a hepatobiliary centre, the devascularised CBD was excised and replaced with a roux-en-y hepaticojejunostomy. Necrotic tissue was debrided from the pancreatic head. A persistent bile leak developed from the sub-hepatic drain. Repeat laparotomy revealed a bile leak from small ducts on the liver surface. Ligation of the ducts and bioglue sealing of the area were successfully performed. Subsequent to this a pancreatic fistula developed from the main pancreatic duct, which has since resolved. This unusual case illustrates the need for prompt recognition and early repair to optimise outcomes in traumatic CBD injury.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Accidents, Aviationen_GB
dc.subject.meshCommon Bile Duct/*injuriesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshWounds, Nonpenetrating/*complications/*surgeryen_GB
dc.titleThe "flying" bile duct: avulsion of the common bile duct in a plane crash survivor.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland., eibhlinmohan@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish journal of medical scienceen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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