Effect of chronic hepatitis C virus infection on bone disease in postmenopausal women.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207540
Title:
Effect of chronic hepatitis C virus infection on bone disease in postmenopausal women.
Authors:
Nanda, Kavinderjit S; Ryan, Elizabeth J; Murray, Barbara F; Brady, Jennifer J; McKenna, Malachi J; Nolan, Niamh; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Hegarty, John E
Affiliation:
National Liver Transplant Unit, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin,, Ireland.
Citation:
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2009 Aug;7(8):894-9. Epub 2009 Jan 24.
Journal:
Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal, of the American Gastroenterological Association
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207540
DOI:
10.1016/j.cgh.2009.01.011
PubMed ID:
19558999
Abstract:
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Limited data are available on the contribution of chronic HCV infection to the development of bone disease in postmenopausal women. We studied whether women who acquired HCV infection through administration of HCV genotype 1b-contaminated anti-D immunoglobulin from a single source had decreased bone mineral density (BMD) or altered levels of bone turnover markers (BTMs), compared with women who spontaneously resolved infection or age-matched healthy controls. METHODS: From a cohort of postmenopausal Irish women, we compared BMD, determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and a panel of BTMs in 20 women chronically infected with HCV (PCR(+)), 21 women who had spontaneously resolved infection (PCR(-)), and 23 age-matched healthy controls. RESULTS: Levels of BTMs and BMD were similar in PCR(+) and PCR(-) women and healthy age-matched controls. However, there was an increased frequency of fractures in PCR(+) (n = 6) compared with PCR(-) women (n = 0, P = .007). PCR(+) women with fractures were postmenopausal for a longer time (median, 15.5, range, 5-20 years vs 4.5, range, 1-20 years in PCR(+) women without fractures; P = .033), had lower BMD at the hip (0.79, range, 0.77-0.9 g/cm(2) vs 0.96, range, 0.81-1.10 g/cm(2); P = .007), and had a lower body mass index (23.7, range 21.2-28.5 kg/m(2) vs 25.6, range 22.1-36.6 kg/m(2); P = .035). There was no difference in liver disease severity or BTMs in PCR(+) women with or without fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic HCV infection did not lead to discernable metabolic bone disease in postmenopausal women, but it might be a risk factor for bone fractures, so preventive measures should be introduced. To view this article's video abstract, go to the AGA's YouTube Channel.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Absorptiometry, Photon; Aged; Animals; Bone Density; Bone and Bones/physiology/radiography; Cohort Studies; Female; Hepatitis C, Chronic/*complications; Humans; Middle Aged; Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal/*epidemiology; Rho(D) Immune Globulin/adverse effects
ISSN:
1542-7714 (Electronic); 1542-3565 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNanda, Kavinderjit Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Elizabeth Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Barbara Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Jennifer Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcKenna, Malachi Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Niamhen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Farrelly, Clionaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHegarty, John Een_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:30:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:30:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:30:45Z-
dc.identifier.citationClin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2009 Aug;7(8):894-9. Epub 2009 Jan 24.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1542-7714 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1542-3565 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19558999en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cgh.2009.01.011en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207540-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND & AIMS: Limited data are available on the contribution of chronic HCV infection to the development of bone disease in postmenopausal women. We studied whether women who acquired HCV infection through administration of HCV genotype 1b-contaminated anti-D immunoglobulin from a single source had decreased bone mineral density (BMD) or altered levels of bone turnover markers (BTMs), compared with women who spontaneously resolved infection or age-matched healthy controls. METHODS: From a cohort of postmenopausal Irish women, we compared BMD, determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and a panel of BTMs in 20 women chronically infected with HCV (PCR(+)), 21 women who had spontaneously resolved infection (PCR(-)), and 23 age-matched healthy controls. RESULTS: Levels of BTMs and BMD were similar in PCR(+) and PCR(-) women and healthy age-matched controls. However, there was an increased frequency of fractures in PCR(+) (n = 6) compared with PCR(-) women (n = 0, P = .007). PCR(+) women with fractures were postmenopausal for a longer time (median, 15.5, range, 5-20 years vs 4.5, range, 1-20 years in PCR(+) women without fractures; P = .033), had lower BMD at the hip (0.79, range, 0.77-0.9 g/cm(2) vs 0.96, range, 0.81-1.10 g/cm(2); P = .007), and had a lower body mass index (23.7, range 21.2-28.5 kg/m(2) vs 25.6, range 22.1-36.6 kg/m(2); P = .035). There was no difference in liver disease severity or BTMs in PCR(+) women with or without fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic HCV infection did not lead to discernable metabolic bone disease in postmenopausal women, but it might be a risk factor for bone fractures, so preventive measures should be introduced. To view this article's video abstract, go to the AGA's YouTube Channel.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAbsorptiometry, Photonen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshBone Densityen_GB
dc.subject.meshBone and Bones/physiology/radiographyen_GB
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHepatitis C, Chronic/*complicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshOsteoporosis, Postmenopausal/*epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshRho(D) Immune Globulin/adverse effectsen_GB
dc.titleEffect of chronic hepatitis C virus infection on bone disease in postmenopausal women.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNational Liver Transplant Unit, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin,, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalClinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal, of the American Gastroenterological Associationen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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