Failure to attend out-patient clinics: is it in our DNA?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207503
Title:
Failure to attend out-patient clinics: is it in our DNA?
Authors:
Roberts, Kinley; Callanan, Ian; Tubridy, Niall
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2011;24(5):406-12.
Journal:
International journal of health care quality assurance
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207503
PubMed ID:
21916092
Abstract:
PURPOSE: This paper aims to determine the reasons why patients miss clinic appointments and to ascertain patients' views on the implementation of reminder systems and penalty fees to reduce the rates of did not attend (DNAs). Overall, the paper seeks to establish novel ways to run a more efficient out-patient department (OPD) service to improve waiting times and access for patients to limited neurology resources. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A questionnaire-based study was approved by the audit committee and was offered to 204 out-patients attending the neurology clinics over a three-month period (July to September 2009). The patients' demographic details and non-attendance records were reviewed. The paper aimed to ascertain, from the patients' perspective, why people failed to attend clinic appointments. Each participant was asked their views on how they felt their public hospital service might reduce the number of DNAs at their neurology OPD. FINDINGS: A total of 204 patients took part. Participants had a mean age of 31 years (range 25-75 years) with a modal peak in the 26 to 35 age bracket. Almost 10 per cent of those surveyed admitted to missing a hospital out-patient appointment in the past. The most common reason was that they simply "forgot" (28 per cent). DNA rates by age range were proportionally similar to the overall age profile of attenders. Over 55 per cent said they would like a pre-appointment reminder via a mobile telephone text message, 19 per cent preferred a pre-appointment telephone call, and 19 per cent an e-mail. Of those surveyed, 47 per cent said they would be willing to pay a fee on booking that could be refunded on attending for their appointment. The majority of these felt Euro 20 was the most appropriate amount (39 per cent). The rate of acceptance for various fee amounts was uniform across age ranges. Over half (52 per cent) said that they would agree to a "buddy" system whereby the appointment reminder was sent to the patient but also a nominated friend or relative. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Non-attendance rates at the neurology clinics in our institution are high with almost 10 per cent of attendees admitting to missing an appointment. One of the main reasons why people did not attend was because they simply "forgot" that they had an appointment and the patients favoured a text messaging reminder system to help reduce non-attendance. Almost half of the respondents said that they would be willing to pay a refundable booking fee.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; *Appointments and Schedules; Female; Hospitals, Public/statistics & numerical data; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Neurology/statistics & numerical data; Outpatient Clinics, Hospital/*statistics & numerical data; Patient Compliance; Questionnaires; Reminder Systems; Socioeconomic Factors
ISSN:
0952-6862 (Print); 0952-6862 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Kinleyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCallanan, Ianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTubridy, Niallen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:29:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:29:40Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:29:40Z-
dc.identifier.citationInt J Health Care Qual Assur. 2011;24(5):406-12.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0952-6862 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0952-6862 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21916092en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207503-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: This paper aims to determine the reasons why patients miss clinic appointments and to ascertain patients' views on the implementation of reminder systems and penalty fees to reduce the rates of did not attend (DNAs). Overall, the paper seeks to establish novel ways to run a more efficient out-patient department (OPD) service to improve waiting times and access for patients to limited neurology resources. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A questionnaire-based study was approved by the audit committee and was offered to 204 out-patients attending the neurology clinics over a three-month period (July to September 2009). The patients' demographic details and non-attendance records were reviewed. The paper aimed to ascertain, from the patients' perspective, why people failed to attend clinic appointments. Each participant was asked their views on how they felt their public hospital service might reduce the number of DNAs at their neurology OPD. FINDINGS: A total of 204 patients took part. Participants had a mean age of 31 years (range 25-75 years) with a modal peak in the 26 to 35 age bracket. Almost 10 per cent of those surveyed admitted to missing a hospital out-patient appointment in the past. The most common reason was that they simply "forgot" (28 per cent). DNA rates by age range were proportionally similar to the overall age profile of attenders. Over 55 per cent said they would like a pre-appointment reminder via a mobile telephone text message, 19 per cent preferred a pre-appointment telephone call, and 19 per cent an e-mail. Of those surveyed, 47 per cent said they would be willing to pay a fee on booking that could be refunded on attending for their appointment. The majority of these felt Euro 20 was the most appropriate amount (39 per cent). The rate of acceptance for various fee amounts was uniform across age ranges. Over half (52 per cent) said that they would agree to a "buddy" system whereby the appointment reminder was sent to the patient but also a nominated friend or relative. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Non-attendance rates at the neurology clinics in our institution are high with almost 10 per cent of attendees admitting to missing an appointment. One of the main reasons why people did not attend was because they simply "forgot" that they had an appointment and the patients favoured a text messaging reminder system to help reduce non-attendance. Almost half of the respondents said that they would be willing to pay a refundable booking fee.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Appointments and Schedulesen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Public/statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshNeurology/statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshOutpatient Clinics, Hospital/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshPatient Complianceen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.meshReminder Systemsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_GB
dc.titleFailure to attend out-patient clinics: is it in our DNA?en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neurology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of health care quality assuranceen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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