Full thickness burn caused by exposure to giant hogweed: delayed presentation, histological features and surgical management.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207449
Title:
Full thickness burn caused by exposure to giant hogweed: delayed presentation, histological features and surgical management.
Authors:
Chan, Jeffrey C Y; Sullivan, Paul J; O'Sullivan, Maureen J; Eadie, Patricia A
Affiliation:
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Our Lady's Children's Hospital,, Crumlin, Dublin 12, Ireland. chancy@eircom.net
Citation:
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2011 Jan;64(1):128-30. Epub 2010 Apr 15.
Journal:
Journal of plastic, reconstructive & aesthetic surgery : JPRAS
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207449
DOI:
10.1016/j.bjps.2010.03.030
PubMed ID:
20399165
Abstract:
We report the case of a 10-year-old boy with a full thickness chemical burn on his right pretibial area due to phytophotodermatitis (PPD) following contact with giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum). Although cutaneous burns due to plants are a well-established cause of chemical burn, previous reports described partial thickness burns that healed with conservative measures. This patient presented to our unit two weeks after the initial injury with an established full thickness burn. Debridement and split thickness skin grafting was required. We presented the histological features of the debrided skin specimen and discussed potential factors leading to this unexpected full thickness injury.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Biopsy, Needle; Burns, Chemical/*etiology/pathology/*surgery; Child; Debridement/methods; Dermatitis, Phototoxic/complications/*diagnosis; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Lower Extremity; Male; Plant Weeds/adverse effects; Plants, Toxic/*adverse effects; Severity of Illness Index; Skin Transplantation/*methods; Wound Healing/physiology
ISSN:
1878-0539 (Electronic); 1748-6815 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChan, Jeffrey C Yen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Paul Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Maureen Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEadie, Patricia Aen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:25:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:25:18Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:25:18Z-
dc.identifier.citationJ Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2011 Jan;64(1):128-30. Epub 2010 Apr 15.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1878-0539 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1748-6815 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20399165en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bjps.2010.03.030en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207449-
dc.description.abstractWe report the case of a 10-year-old boy with a full thickness chemical burn on his right pretibial area due to phytophotodermatitis (PPD) following contact with giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum). Although cutaneous burns due to plants are a well-established cause of chemical burn, previous reports described partial thickness burns that healed with conservative measures. This patient presented to our unit two weeks after the initial injury with an established full thickness burn. Debridement and split thickness skin grafting was required. We presented the histological features of the debrided skin specimen and discussed potential factors leading to this unexpected full thickness injury.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshBiopsy, Needleen_GB
dc.subject.meshBurns, Chemical/*etiology/pathology/*surgeryen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshDebridement/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshDermatitis, Phototoxic/complications/*diagnosisen_GB
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistryen_GB
dc.subject.meshLower Extremityen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshPlant Weeds/adverse effectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPlants, Toxic/*adverse effectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshSkin Transplantation/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshWound Healing/physiologyen_GB
dc.titleFull thickness burn caused by exposure to giant hogweed: delayed presentation, histological features and surgical management.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Our Lady's Children's Hospital,, Crumlin, Dublin 12, Ireland. chancy@eircom.neten_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of plastic, reconstructive & aesthetic surgery : JPRASen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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