Eating concerns and media influences in an Irish adolescent context.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207434
Title:
Eating concerns and media influences in an Irish adolescent context.
Authors:
McNicholas, Fiona; Lydon, Alma; Lennon, Ruth; Dooley, Barbara
Affiliation:
Department of Child Psychiatry, Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin,, Dublin12, Ireland. Fiona.mcnicholas@sjog.ie
Citation:
Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2009 May;17(3):208-13.
Journal:
European eating disorders review : the journal of the Eating Disorders, Association
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207434
DOI:
10.1002/erv.916
PubMed ID:
19253903
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: EPICA is the first large-scale Irish study of a school-going population examining the impact of media influences on eating attitudes. METHOD: Students were screened using the EAT-26, EDI-III and a study-specific questionnaire. A sub-sample of parents' views was included. RESULTS: Three thousand and thirty-one students (mean age 14.74) and 56 parents enrolled. The majority (71.4%) of adolescents felt adversely affected by media portrayal of body weight and shape, with more than a quarter (25.6%) believing it to be 'far too thin'. A significant correlation between media impact and high EAT scores (chi2 = 450.78, df = 2, p < 0.05) and EDI-III scores (chi2 = 387.51, df = 4, p < 0.05) was demonstrated. Parents also view media portrayal as too thin (94.7%), less than half are adversely affected by it (49.2%) but the majority (71.9%) believe their children to be. CONCLUSION: Media portrayal of body weight and shape is correlated with eating psychopathology and may affect adolescents more than adults. School psycho-educational programmes and media policies are urgently needed to minimise any detrimental effect.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adolescent; Age Factors; *Body Image; Body Mass Index; Body Weight/physiology; Eating/*psychology; Feeding Behavior/*psychology; Female; Humans; Ireland; Male; *Mass Media; *Personal Satisfaction; Questionnaires; *Self Concept; Sex Factors; Students
ISSN:
1099-0968 (Electronic); 1072-4133 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcNicholas, Fionaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLydon, Almaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLennon, Ruthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDooley, Barbaraen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:24:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:24:55Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:24:55Z-
dc.identifier.citationEur Eat Disord Rev. 2009 May;17(3):208-13.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1099-0968 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1072-4133 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19253903en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/erv.916en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207434-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: EPICA is the first large-scale Irish study of a school-going population examining the impact of media influences on eating attitudes. METHOD: Students were screened using the EAT-26, EDI-III and a study-specific questionnaire. A sub-sample of parents' views was included. RESULTS: Three thousand and thirty-one students (mean age 14.74) and 56 parents enrolled. The majority (71.4%) of adolescents felt adversely affected by media portrayal of body weight and shape, with more than a quarter (25.6%) believing it to be 'far too thin'. A significant correlation between media impact and high EAT scores (chi2 = 450.78, df = 2, p < 0.05) and EDI-III scores (chi2 = 387.51, df = 4, p < 0.05) was demonstrated. Parents also view media portrayal as too thin (94.7%), less than half are adversely affected by it (49.2%) but the majority (71.9%) believe their children to be. CONCLUSION: Media portrayal of body weight and shape is correlated with eating psychopathology and may affect adolescents more than adults. School psycho-educational programmes and media policies are urgently needed to minimise any detrimental effect.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Body Imageen_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Weight/physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshEating/*psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFeeding Behavior/*psychologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Mass Mediaen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Personal Satisfactionen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Self Concepten_GB
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshStudentsen_GB
dc.titleEating concerns and media influences in an Irish adolescent context.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Child Psychiatry, Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin,, Dublin12, Ireland. Fiona.mcnicholas@sjog.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean eating disorders review : the journal of the Eating Disorders, Associationen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.