Medical futility in children's nursing: making end-of-life decisions.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207425
Title:
Medical futility in children's nursing: making end-of-life decisions.
Authors:
Brien, Irene O; Duffy, Anita; Shea, Ellen O
Affiliation:
Our Lady's Hospital for Sick Children, Crumlin, Dublin.
Citation:
Br J Nurs. 2010 Mar 25-Apr 7;19(6):352-6.
Journal:
British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207425
PubMed ID:
20335914
Abstract:
Caring for infants at end of life is challenging and distressing for parents and healthcare professionals, especially in relation to making decisions regarding withholding or withdrawal of treatment. The concept of medical futility must be considered under these circumstances. Parents and healthcare professionals should be involved together in making these difficult decisions. However, for some parents, emotions and guilt often are unbearable and, understandably, parents can be reluctant to make a decision. Despite the recognition of parental autonomy, if parents disagree with a decision made by medical staff, the case will be referred to and solved by the courts. The courts' decisions are often based on the best interest of the child. In this article, the authors discuss the concepts of 'parental autonomy' and 'the child's best interests' when determining medical futility for infants or neonates. The role of the nurse when caring for the dying child and their family is multifaceted. While nurses do not have a legitimate role in decision making at the end of life, it is often nurses who, through their advocacy role, inform doctors about parents' wishes and it is often nurses who support parents during this difficult time. Furthermore, nurses caring for dying children should be familiar to the family, experienced in end-of-life care and comfortable talking to parents about death and dying and treatment choices. Children's nurses therefore require advanced communication skills and an essential understanding of the ethical and legal knowledge relating to medical futility in end-of-life children's nursing.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
*Decision Making/ethics; Great Britain; Human Rights; Humans; Infant; Infant Welfare/*legislation & jurisprudence; Infant, Newborn; Ireland; *Medical Futility; Nurse's Role; Parental Consent/*legislation & jurisprudence; Pediatric Nursing; *Terminal Care
ISSN:
0966-0461 (Print); 0966-0461 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrien, Irene Oen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Anitaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorShea, Ellen Oen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:24:41Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:24:41Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:24:41Z-
dc.identifier.citationBr J Nurs. 2010 Mar 25-Apr 7;19(6):352-6.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0966-0461 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0966-0461 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20335914en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207425-
dc.description.abstractCaring for infants at end of life is challenging and distressing for parents and healthcare professionals, especially in relation to making decisions regarding withholding or withdrawal of treatment. The concept of medical futility must be considered under these circumstances. Parents and healthcare professionals should be involved together in making these difficult decisions. However, for some parents, emotions and guilt often are unbearable and, understandably, parents can be reluctant to make a decision. Despite the recognition of parental autonomy, if parents disagree with a decision made by medical staff, the case will be referred to and solved by the courts. The courts' decisions are often based on the best interest of the child. In this article, the authors discuss the concepts of 'parental autonomy' and 'the child's best interests' when determining medical futility for infants or neonates. The role of the nurse when caring for the dying child and their family is multifaceted. While nurses do not have a legitimate role in decision making at the end of life, it is often nurses who, through their advocacy role, inform doctors about parents' wishes and it is often nurses who support parents during this difficult time. Furthermore, nurses caring for dying children should be familiar to the family, experienced in end-of-life care and comfortable talking to parents about death and dying and treatment choices. Children's nurses therefore require advanced communication skills and an essential understanding of the ethical and legal knowledge relating to medical futility in end-of-life children's nursing.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Decision Making/ethicsen_GB
dc.subject.meshGreat Britainen_GB
dc.subject.meshHuman Rightsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfanten_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant Welfare/*legislation & jurisprudenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Medical Futilityen_GB
dc.subject.meshNurse's Roleen_GB
dc.subject.meshParental Consent/*legislation & jurisprudenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshPediatric Nursingen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Terminal Careen_GB
dc.titleMedical futility in children's nursing: making end-of-life decisions.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentOur Lady's Hospital for Sick Children, Crumlin, Dublin.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBritish journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)en_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-
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