Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207414
Title:
Subclinical hypothyroidism in childhood.
Authors:
O'Grady, M J; Cody, D
Affiliation:
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Our Ladys Childrens Hospital, Crumlin, , Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Arch Dis Child. 2011 Mar;96(3):280-4. Epub 2010 Apr 22.
Journal:
Archives of disease in childhood
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207414
DOI:
10.1136/adc.2009.181800
PubMed ID:
20413616
Abstract:
Subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) is defined as an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in association with a normal total or free thyroxine (T4) or triiodothyronine (T3). It is frequently encountered in both neonatology and general paediatric practice; however, its clinical significance is widely debated. Currently there is no broad consensus on the investigation and treatment of these patients; specifically who to treat and what cut-off level of TSH should be used. This paper reviews the available evidence regarding investigation, treatments and outcomes reported for childhood SH.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Child; Child, Preschool; Down Syndrome/complications; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Hormone Replacement Therapy/methods; Humans; Hypothyroidism/*diagnosis/drug therapy/etiology; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Thyrotropin/blood; Thyroxine/therapeutic use
ISSN:
1468-2044 (Electronic); 0003-9888 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Grady, M Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCody, Den_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:24:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:24:24Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:24:24Z-
dc.identifier.citationArch Dis Child. 2011 Mar;96(3):280-4. Epub 2010 Apr 22.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1468-2044 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0003-9888 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20413616en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/adc.2009.181800en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207414-
dc.description.abstractSubclinical hypothyroidism (SH) is defined as an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in association with a normal total or free thyroxine (T4) or triiodothyronine (T3). It is frequently encountered in both neonatology and general paediatric practice; however, its clinical significance is widely debated. Currently there is no broad consensus on the investigation and treatment of these patients; specifically who to treat and what cut-off level of TSH should be used. This paper reviews the available evidence regarding investigation, treatments and outcomes reported for childhood SH.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_GB
dc.subject.meshDown Syndrome/complicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Diseaseen_GB
dc.subject.meshHormone Replacement Therapy/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshHypothyroidism/*diagnosis/drug therapy/etiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfanten_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.meshThyrotropin/blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshThyroxine/therapeutic useen_GB
dc.titleSubclinical hypothyroidism in childhood.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Our Ladys Childrens Hospital, Crumlin, , Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalArchives of disease in childhooden_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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