Cow-related trauma: a 10-year review of injuries admitted to a single institution.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207353
Title:
Cow-related trauma: a 10-year review of injuries admitted to a single institution.
Authors:
Murphy, Colin G; McGuire, Ciara M; O'Malley, Natasha; Harrington, Paul
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedics, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital Drogheda, Co. Louth,, Ireland. cmurphy@rcsi.ie
Citation:
Injury. 2010 May;41(5):548-50. Epub 2009 Sep 3.
Journal:
Injury
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207353
DOI:
10.1016/j.injury.2009.08.006
PubMed ID:
19729160
Abstract:
INTRODUCTION: Bovine-related injuries to farmers are common in rural communities. Many injuries are significant requiring hospital admission and surgery. We reviewed all cattle-related injuries admitted to a regional trauma centre over 10 years and detail the nature of the injuries. METHOD: A retrospective review was undertaken, using hospital inpatient coding system (HIPE) to identify patients admitted following cow-related trauma for the last 10 years. From retrieved charts mechanism of injury was identified, demographics recorded and Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Trauma Injury Severity Score (TRISS) calculated based on the injuries sustained. RESULTS: 47 patients were identified, with a median age of 53 years. 4 injuries occurred in children, and 12 in patients over 65 years old. Three-quarters of those injured were male. Kicking was the most common mechanism of injury (n=21), but charge/head-butt injuries and trampling injuries were associated with more serious injury scores. 72% of patients were admitted under Orthopaedics as their primary care team, 25% under General Surgeons, with one patient admitted medically. Mean ISS score was 6.9 (range 1-50). 41 operative interventions were performed on 30 patients during their admission. 6.3% of patients required admission to Intensive Care with a mean length of stay of 12.3 days (range 2-21 days). There was no mortality. CONCLUSION: Cow-related trauma is a common among farming communities and is a potentially serious mechanism of injury that appears to be under-reported in a hospital context. Bovine-related head-butt and trampling injuries should be considered akin to high-velocity trauma.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Accidents, Occupational/*statistics & numerical data; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Animal Husbandry/*statistics & numerical data; Animals; Behavior, Animal; *Cattle; Female; Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Retrospective Studies; Rural Health/*statistics & numerical data; Trauma Centers; Trauma Severity Indices; Wounds and Injuries/*epidemiology/etiology; Young Adult
ISSN:
1879-0267 (Electronic); 0020-1383 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Colin Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, Ciara Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Malley, Natashaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarrington, Paulen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:21:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:21:20Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:21:20Z-
dc.identifier.citationInjury. 2010 May;41(5):548-50. Epub 2009 Sep 3.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1879-0267 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0020-1383 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19729160en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.injury.2009.08.006en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207353-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Bovine-related injuries to farmers are common in rural communities. Many injuries are significant requiring hospital admission and surgery. We reviewed all cattle-related injuries admitted to a regional trauma centre over 10 years and detail the nature of the injuries. METHOD: A retrospective review was undertaken, using hospital inpatient coding system (HIPE) to identify patients admitted following cow-related trauma for the last 10 years. From retrieved charts mechanism of injury was identified, demographics recorded and Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Trauma Injury Severity Score (TRISS) calculated based on the injuries sustained. RESULTS: 47 patients were identified, with a median age of 53 years. 4 injuries occurred in children, and 12 in patients over 65 years old. Three-quarters of those injured were male. Kicking was the most common mechanism of injury (n=21), but charge/head-butt injuries and trampling injuries were associated with more serious injury scores. 72% of patients were admitted under Orthopaedics as their primary care team, 25% under General Surgeons, with one patient admitted medically. Mean ISS score was 6.9 (range 1-50). 41 operative interventions were performed on 30 patients during their admission. 6.3% of patients required admission to Intensive Care with a mean length of stay of 12.3 days (range 2-21 days). There was no mortality. CONCLUSION: Cow-related trauma is a common among farming communities and is a potentially serious mechanism of injury that appears to be under-reported in a hospital context. Bovine-related head-butt and trampling injuries should be considered akin to high-velocity trauma.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAccidents, Occupational/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimal Husbandry/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshBehavior, Animalen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Cattleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHospitalization/statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshRural Health/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshTrauma Centersen_GB
dc.subject.meshTrauma Severity Indicesen_GB
dc.subject.meshWounds and Injuries/*epidemiology/etiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleCow-related trauma: a 10-year review of injuries admitted to a single institution.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Orthopaedics, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital Drogheda, Co. Louth,, Ireland. cmurphy@rcsi.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalInjuryen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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