Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid haemorrhage - in "Endocrine Management in the Intensive Care Unit".

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207344
Title:
Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid haemorrhage - in "Endocrine Management in the Intensive Care Unit".
Authors:
Hannon, M J; Sherlock, M; Thompson, C J
Affiliation:
Academic Department of Endocrinology, Beaumont Hospital/RCSI Medical School,, Beaumont Road, Dublin 9, Ireland.
Citation:
Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Oct;25(5):783-98.
Journal:
Best practice & research. Clinical endocrinology & metabolism
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207344
DOI:
10.1016/j.beem.2011.06.001
PubMed ID:
21925078
Abstract:
Traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. There is a large body of evidence that demonstrates that both conditions may adversely affect pituitary function in both the acute and chronic phases of recovery. Diagnosis of hypopituitarism and accurate treatment of pituitary disorders offers the opportunity to improve mortality and outcome in both traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In this article, we will review the history and pathophysiology of pituitary function in the acute phase following traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage, and we will discuss in detail three key aspects of pituitary dysfunction which occur in the early course of TBI; acute cortisol deficiency, diabetes insipidus and SIAD.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Brain Injuries/complications/*physiopathology/therapy; Critical Care/trends; Humans; Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/physiopathology; Pituitary Diseases/complications/etiology/*physiopathology/therapy; Pituitary Gland/*physiopathology; Pituitary-Adrenal System/physiopathology; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/complications/*physiopathology/therapy
ISSN:
1532-1908 (Electronic); 1521-690X (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHannon, M Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSherlock, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorThompson, C Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:05:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:05:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:05:19Z-
dc.identifier.citationBest Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Oct;25(5):783-98.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1532-1908 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1521-690X (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21925078en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.beem.2011.06.001en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207344-
dc.description.abstractTraumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. There is a large body of evidence that demonstrates that both conditions may adversely affect pituitary function in both the acute and chronic phases of recovery. Diagnosis of hypopituitarism and accurate treatment of pituitary disorders offers the opportunity to improve mortality and outcome in both traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In this article, we will review the history and pathophysiology of pituitary function in the acute phase following traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage, and we will discuss in detail three key aspects of pituitary dysfunction which occur in the early course of TBI; acute cortisol deficiency, diabetes insipidus and SIAD.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshBrain Injuries/complications/*physiopathology/therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshCritical Care/trendsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshHypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPituitary Diseases/complications/etiology/*physiopathology/therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPituitary Gland/*physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPituitary-Adrenal System/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshSubarachnoid Hemorrhage/complications/*physiopathology/therapyen_GB
dc.titlePituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid haemorrhage - in "Endocrine Management in the Intensive Care Unit".en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAcademic Department of Endocrinology, Beaumont Hospital/RCSI Medical School,, Beaumont Road, Dublin 9, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBest practice & research. Clinical endocrinology & metabolismen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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