SLPI and inflammatory lung disease in females.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207340
Title:
SLPI and inflammatory lung disease in females.
Authors:
McKiernan, Paul J; McElvaney, Noel G; Greene, Catherine M
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Respiratory Research Royal College of Surgeons in, Ireland, Education and Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland.
Citation:
Biochem Soc Trans. 2011 Oct;39(5):1421-6.
Journal:
Biochemical Society transactions
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207340
DOI:
10.1042/BST0391421
PubMed ID:
21936826
Abstract:
During the course of certain inflammatory lung diseases, SLPI (secretory leucoprotease inhibitor) plays a number of important roles. As a serine antiprotease it functions to protect the airways from proteolytic damage due to neutrophil and other immune cell-derived serine proteases. With respect to infection it has known antimicrobial and anti-viral properties that are likely to contribute to host defence. Another of its properties is the ability to control inflammation within the lung where it can interfere with the transcriptional induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression induced by NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB). Thus, factors that regulate the expression of SLPI in the airways can impact on disease severity and outcome. Gender represents once such idiosyncratic factor. In females with CF (cystic fibrosis), it is now thought that circulating oestrogen contributes, in part, to the observed gender gap whereby females have worse disease and poorer prognosis than males. Conversely, in asthma, sufferers who are females have more frequent exacerbations at times of low-circulating oestrogen. In the present paper, we discuss how SLPI participates in these events and speculate on whether regulatory mechanisms such as post-transcriptional modulation by miRNAs (microRNAs) are important in the control of SLPI expression in inflammatory lung disease.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Animals; Bronchi/drug effects; Cystic Fibrosis/metabolism/physiopathology; Estrogens/metabolism/pharmacology; Female; Gene Expression Regulation; Humans; Inflammation/*metabolism; Lung Diseases/*metabolism/physiopathology; MicroRNAs/genetics/metabolism; Secretory Leukocyte Peptidase Inhibitor/*metabolism
ISSN:
1470-8752 (Electronic); 0300-5127 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcKiernan, Paul Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcElvaney, Noel Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGreene, Catherine Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:05:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:05:14Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:05:14Z-
dc.identifier.citationBiochem Soc Trans. 2011 Oct;39(5):1421-6.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1470-8752 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0300-5127 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21936826en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1042/BST0391421en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207340-
dc.description.abstractDuring the course of certain inflammatory lung diseases, SLPI (secretory leucoprotease inhibitor) plays a number of important roles. As a serine antiprotease it functions to protect the airways from proteolytic damage due to neutrophil and other immune cell-derived serine proteases. With respect to infection it has known antimicrobial and anti-viral properties that are likely to contribute to host defence. Another of its properties is the ability to control inflammation within the lung where it can interfere with the transcriptional induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression induced by NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB). Thus, factors that regulate the expression of SLPI in the airways can impact on disease severity and outcome. Gender represents once such idiosyncratic factor. In females with CF (cystic fibrosis), it is now thought that circulating oestrogen contributes, in part, to the observed gender gap whereby females have worse disease and poorer prognosis than males. Conversely, in asthma, sufferers who are females have more frequent exacerbations at times of low-circulating oestrogen. In the present paper, we discuss how SLPI participates in these events and speculate on whether regulatory mechanisms such as post-transcriptional modulation by miRNAs (microRNAs) are important in the control of SLPI expression in inflammatory lung disease.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshBronchi/drug effectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshCystic Fibrosis/metabolism/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshEstrogens/metabolism/pharmacologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Regulationen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInflammation/*metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshLung Diseases/*metabolism/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMicroRNAs/genetics/metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshSecretory Leukocyte Peptidase Inhibitor/*metabolismen_GB
dc.titleSLPI and inflammatory lung disease in females.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Respiratory Research Royal College of Surgeons in, Ireland, Education and Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBiochemical Society transactionsen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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