Acupuncture as an adjunct to pulmonary rehabilitation.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207322
Title:
Acupuncture as an adjunct to pulmonary rehabilitation.
Authors:
Deering, Brenda M; Fullen, Brona; Egan, Claire; McCormack, Niamh; Kelly, Emer; Pender, Mary; Costello, Richard W
Affiliation:
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Beaumont Hospital and the associated, Education and Research Centre, University College of Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev. 2011 Nov;31(6):392-9.
Journal:
Journal of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation and prevention
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207322
DOI:
10.1097/HCR.0b013e31822f0f61
PubMed ID:
21979114
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation and by both systemic and airway inflammation. In COPD, acupuncture has been shown to improve quality-of-life scores and decrease breathlessness; similar findings have also been reported after pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). The hypothesis of this study was that acupuncture in conjunction with pulmonary rehabilitation would improve COPD outcome measures compared to pulmonary rehabilitation alone. METHODS: The design was a randomized prospective study; all subjects had COPD. There were 19 controls, 25 who underwent PR, and 16 who had both acupuncture and PR. The primary outcome measure was a change in measures of systemic inflammation at the end of PR and at 3 month followup. Lung function, including maximum inspiratory pressure (PiMax), quality-of-life scores, functional capacity including steps taken, dyspnea scores, and exercise capacity, were secondary endpoints. RESULTS: After PR, both groups had significantly improved quality-of-life scores, reduced dyspnea scores, improved exercise capacity, and PiMax, but no change in measures of systemic inflammation compared with the controls. There were no differences in most of the outcome measures between the 2 treatment groups except that subjects who had both acupuncture and PR remained less breathless for a longer period. CONCLUSION: The addition of acupuncture to PR did not add significant benefit in most of the outcomes measured.
Language:
eng
ISSN:
1932-751X (Electronic); 1932-7501 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDeering, Brenda Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorFullen, Bronaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEgan, Claireen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCormack, Niamhen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Emeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorPender, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCostello, Richard Wen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:04:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:04:49Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:04:49Z-
dc.identifier.citationJ Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev. 2011 Nov;31(6):392-9.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1932-751X (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1932-7501 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21979114en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/HCR.0b013e31822f0f61en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207322-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation and by both systemic and airway inflammation. In COPD, acupuncture has been shown to improve quality-of-life scores and decrease breathlessness; similar findings have also been reported after pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). The hypothesis of this study was that acupuncture in conjunction with pulmonary rehabilitation would improve COPD outcome measures compared to pulmonary rehabilitation alone. METHODS: The design was a randomized prospective study; all subjects had COPD. There were 19 controls, 25 who underwent PR, and 16 who had both acupuncture and PR. The primary outcome measure was a change in measures of systemic inflammation at the end of PR and at 3 month followup. Lung function, including maximum inspiratory pressure (PiMax), quality-of-life scores, functional capacity including steps taken, dyspnea scores, and exercise capacity, were secondary endpoints. RESULTS: After PR, both groups had significantly improved quality-of-life scores, reduced dyspnea scores, improved exercise capacity, and PiMax, but no change in measures of systemic inflammation compared with the controls. There were no differences in most of the outcome measures between the 2 treatment groups except that subjects who had both acupuncture and PR remained less breathless for a longer period. CONCLUSION: The addition of acupuncture to PR did not add significant benefit in most of the outcomes measured.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.titleAcupuncture as an adjunct to pulmonary rehabilitation.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Beaumont Hospital and the associated, Education and Research Centre, University College of Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation and preventionen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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