Hypothesis review: are clathrin-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-dependent membrane and protein trafficking core pathophysiological processes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207316
Title:
Hypothesis review: are clathrin-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-dependent membrane and protein trafficking core pathophysiological processes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder?
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Beaumont, Hospital, Dublin, Republic of Ireland.
Citation:
Mol Psychiatry. 2011 Oct 11. doi: 10.1038/mp.2011.123.
Journal:
Molecular psychiatry
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207316
DOI:
10.1038/mp.2011.123
PubMed ID:
21986877
Abstract:
Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is the best-characterized mechanism governing cellular membrane and protein trafficking. In this hypothesis review, we integrate recent evidence implicating CME and related cellular trafficking mechanisms in the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The evidence includes proteomic and genomic findings implicating proteins and genes of the clathrin interactome. Additionally, several important candidate genes for schizophrenia, such as dysbindin, are involved in processes closely linked to CME and membrane trafficking. We discuss that key aspects of psychosis neuropathology such as synaptic dysfunction, white matter changes and aberrant neurodevelopment are all influenced by clathrin-dependent processes, and that other cellular trafficking mechanisms previously linked to psychoses interact with the clathrin interactome in important ways. Furthermore, many antipsychotic drugs have been shown to affect clathrin-interacting proteins. We propose that the targeted pharmacological manipulation of the clathrin interactome may offer fruitful opportunities for novel treatments of schizophrenia.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 October 2011; doi:10.1038/mp.2011.123.
Language:
ENG
ISSN:
1476-5578 (Electronic); 1359-4184 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:04:41Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:04:41Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:04:41Z-
dc.identifier.citationMol Psychiatry. 2011 Oct 11. doi: 10.1038/mp.2011.123.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1476-5578 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1359-4184 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21986877en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/mp.2011.123en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207316-
dc.description.abstractClathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is the best-characterized mechanism governing cellular membrane and protein trafficking. In this hypothesis review, we integrate recent evidence implicating CME and related cellular trafficking mechanisms in the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The evidence includes proteomic and genomic findings implicating proteins and genes of the clathrin interactome. Additionally, several important candidate genes for schizophrenia, such as dysbindin, are involved in processes closely linked to CME and membrane trafficking. We discuss that key aspects of psychosis neuropathology such as synaptic dysfunction, white matter changes and aberrant neurodevelopment are all influenced by clathrin-dependent processes, and that other cellular trafficking mechanisms previously linked to psychoses interact with the clathrin interactome in important ways. Furthermore, many antipsychotic drugs have been shown to affect clathrin-interacting proteins. We propose that the targeted pharmacological manipulation of the clathrin interactome may offer fruitful opportunities for novel treatments of schizophrenia.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 October 2011; doi:10.1038/mp.2011.123.en_GB
dc.language.isoENGen_GB
dc.titleHypothesis review: are clathrin-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-dependent membrane and protein trafficking core pathophysiological processes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder?en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Beaumont, Hospital, Dublin, Republic of Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalMolecular psychiatryen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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