Demodex-associated bacterial proteins induce neutrophil activation.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207289
Title:
Demodex-associated bacterial proteins induce neutrophil activation.
Affiliation:
Medical Mycology Unit, Department of Biology, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland. Respiratory Research Division, Department of, Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9,, Ireland.
Citation:
Br J Dermatol. 2011 Nov 19. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2011.10746.x.
Journal:
The British journal of dermatology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207289
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2133.2011.10746.x
PubMed ID:
22098186
Abstract:
Background: Patients with rosacea demonstrate a higher density of Demodex mites in their skin than controls. A bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite from a patient with papulopustular rosacea (PPR) was previously shown to provoke an immune response in patients with PPR or ocular rosacea thus suggesting a possible role for bacterial proteins in the etiology of this condition. Objectives: To examine the response of neutrophils to proteins derived from a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite. Methods: Bacterial cells were lysed and proteins were partially purified by AKTA-FPLC. Isolated neutrophils were exposed to bacterial proteins and monitored for alterations in migration, degranulation and cytokine production. Results: Neutrophils exposed to proteins from Bacillus cells demonstrated increased levels of migration and elevated release of MMP-9, an enzyme known to degrade collagen and cathelicidin, an antimicrobial peptide. In addition neutrophils exposed to the bacterial proteins demonstrated elevated rates of Il-8 and TNF-alpha production. Conclusions: Proteins produced by a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite have the ability to increase the migration, degranulation and cytokine production abilities of neutrophils. These results suggest that bacteria may play a role in the inflammatory erythema associated with rosacea.
Language:
ENG
ISSN:
1365-2133 (Electronic); 0007-0963 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:04:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:04:05Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:04:05Z-
dc.identifier.citationBr J Dermatol. 2011 Nov 19. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2011.10746.x.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1365-2133 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0007-0963 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid22098186en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2133.2011.10746.xen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207289-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Patients with rosacea demonstrate a higher density of Demodex mites in their skin than controls. A bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite from a patient with papulopustular rosacea (PPR) was previously shown to provoke an immune response in patients with PPR or ocular rosacea thus suggesting a possible role for bacterial proteins in the etiology of this condition. Objectives: To examine the response of neutrophils to proteins derived from a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite. Methods: Bacterial cells were lysed and proteins were partially purified by AKTA-FPLC. Isolated neutrophils were exposed to bacterial proteins and monitored for alterations in migration, degranulation and cytokine production. Results: Neutrophils exposed to proteins from Bacillus cells demonstrated increased levels of migration and elevated release of MMP-9, an enzyme known to degrade collagen and cathelicidin, an antimicrobial peptide. In addition neutrophils exposed to the bacterial proteins demonstrated elevated rates of Il-8 and TNF-alpha production. Conclusions: Proteins produced by a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite have the ability to increase the migration, degranulation and cytokine production abilities of neutrophils. These results suggest that bacteria may play a role in the inflammatory erythema associated with rosacea.en_GB
dc.language.isoENGen_GB
dc.titleDemodex-associated bacterial proteins induce neutrophil activation.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentMedical Mycology Unit, Department of Biology, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland. Respiratory Research Division, Department of, Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9,, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe British journal of dermatologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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