Assessing the functional performance of post-call hospital doctors using a Nintendo Wii.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207274
Title:
Assessing the functional performance of post-call hospital doctors using a Nintendo Wii.
Authors:
Clancy, K; Brady, P; McHugh, S; Corrigan, M A; Sheikh, A; Lehane, E; Hill, A D K
Affiliation:
Beaumont Hospital RCSI, Beaumont Road, Dublin 9. kxclancy@gmail.com
Citation:
Ir Med J. 2011 Jun;104(6):171-3.
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207274
PubMed ID:
22111392
Abstract:
Sleep deprivation is an established part of the working life for Non-Consultant Hospital Doctors (NCHDs) in Ireland. Concern exists about the effect of extended NCHD work hours. We utilised a Nintendo Wii to evaluate motor function of NCHDs both prior to their on-call shift and the day afterwards. Data was exported to SPSS ver. 15 for statistical analysis with p < 0.05 considered significant. A total of 72 NCHDs were invited to participate in this study. There was a 62.5% (45) rate of follow-up. Overall 27 (60%) NCHDs were on medical call, with 18 (40%) on surgical call. There was no statistically significant difference between NCHDs pre-and post-call motor assessment scores. The majority of study participants (75.5%, n = 34) had four or more hours sleep. On-call duty allows for a greater than anticipated amount of sleep per on-call shift and therefore has a negligible effect on the motor skills of medical staff.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Female; Humans; Ireland; Male; *Physicians; *Psychomotor Performance; Questionnaires; Sleep Deprivation/*physiopathology; *Video Games; *Work Schedule Tolerance
ISSN:
0332-3102 (Print); 0332-3102 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorClancy, Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcHugh, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCorrigan, M Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSheikh, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLehane, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorHill, A D Ken_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:03:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:03:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:03:45Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr Med J. 2011 Jun;104(6):171-3.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid22111392en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207274-
dc.description.abstractSleep deprivation is an established part of the working life for Non-Consultant Hospital Doctors (NCHDs) in Ireland. Concern exists about the effect of extended NCHD work hours. We utilised a Nintendo Wii to evaluate motor function of NCHDs both prior to their on-call shift and the day afterwards. Data was exported to SPSS ver. 15 for statistical analysis with p < 0.05 considered significant. A total of 72 NCHDs were invited to participate in this study. There was a 62.5% (45) rate of follow-up. Overall 27 (60%) NCHDs were on medical call, with 18 (40%) on surgical call. There was no statistically significant difference between NCHDs pre-and post-call motor assessment scores. The majority of study participants (75.5%, n = 34) had four or more hours sleep. On-call duty allows for a greater than anticipated amount of sleep per on-call shift and therefore has a negligible effect on the motor skills of medical staff.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Physiciansen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Psychomotor Performanceen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSleep Deprivation/*physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Video Gamesen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Work Schedule Toleranceen_GB
dc.titleAssessing the functional performance of post-call hospital doctors using a Nintendo Wii.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeaumont Hospital RCSI, Beaumont Road, Dublin 9. kxclancy@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.