The interaction between growth hormone and the thyroid axis in hypopituitary patients.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207261
Title:
The interaction between growth hormone and the thyroid axis in hypopituitary patients.
Authors:
Behan, Lucy Ann; Monson, John P; Agha, Amar
Affiliation:
Academic Department of Endocrinology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2011 Mar;74(3):281-8. doi:, 10.1111/j.1365-2265.2010.03815.x.
Journal:
Clinical endocrinology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207261
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2265.2010.03815.x
PubMed ID:
20455887
Abstract:
Alterations in the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis have been reported following growth hormone (GH) administration in both adults and children with and without growth hormone deficiency. Reductions in serum free thyroxine (T4), increased tri-iodothyronine (T3) with or without a reduction in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion have been reported following GH replacement, but there are wide inconsistencies in the literature about these perturbations. The clinical significance of these changes in thyroid function remains uncertain. Some authors report the changes are transient and revert to normal after a few months or longer. However, in adult hypopituitary patients, GH replacement has been reported to unmask central hypothyroidism biochemically in 36-47% of apparently euthyroid patients, necessitating thyroxine replacement and resulting in an attenuation of the benefit of GH replacement on quality of life in those who became biochemically hypothyroid after GH replacement. The group at highest risk are those with organic pituitary disease or multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies. It is therefore prudent to monitor thyroid function in hypopituitary patients starting GH therapy to identify those who will develop clinical and biochemical features of central hypothyroidism, thus facilitating optimal and timely replacement.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; Child; *Hormone Replacement Therapy; Human Growth Hormone/*therapeutic use; Humans; Hypopituitarism/blood/*drug therapy/physiopathology; Hypothyroidism/blood; Thyroid Gland/*drug effects/physiology; Thyroxine/blood; Triiodothyronine/blood
ISSN:
1365-2265 (Electronic); 0300-0664 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBehan, Lucy Annen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMonson, John Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAgha, Amaren_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:03:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:03:23Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:03:23Z-
dc.identifier.citationClin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2011 Mar;74(3):281-8. doi:, 10.1111/j.1365-2265.2010.03815.x.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1365-2265 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0300-0664 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20455887en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2265.2010.03815.xen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207261-
dc.description.abstractAlterations in the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis have been reported following growth hormone (GH) administration in both adults and children with and without growth hormone deficiency. Reductions in serum free thyroxine (T4), increased tri-iodothyronine (T3) with or without a reduction in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion have been reported following GH replacement, but there are wide inconsistencies in the literature about these perturbations. The clinical significance of these changes in thyroid function remains uncertain. Some authors report the changes are transient and revert to normal after a few months or longer. However, in adult hypopituitary patients, GH replacement has been reported to unmask central hypothyroidism biochemically in 36-47% of apparently euthyroid patients, necessitating thyroxine replacement and resulting in an attenuation of the benefit of GH replacement on quality of life in those who became biochemically hypothyroid after GH replacement. The group at highest risk are those with organic pituitary disease or multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies. It is therefore prudent to monitor thyroid function in hypopituitary patients starting GH therapy to identify those who will develop clinical and biochemical features of central hypothyroidism, thus facilitating optimal and timely replacement.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Hormone Replacement Therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHuman Growth Hormone/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshHypopituitarism/blood/*drug therapy/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHypothyroidism/blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshThyroid Gland/*drug effects/physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshThyroxine/blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshTriiodothyronine/blooden_GB
dc.titleThe interaction between growth hormone and the thyroid axis in hypopituitary patients.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAcademic Department of Endocrinology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalClinical endocrinologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.