Factors influencing career choice after initial training in surgery.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207183
Title:
Factors influencing career choice after initial training in surgery.
Authors:
McHugh, Seamus; Corrigan, Mark; Sheikh, Athar; Lehane, Elaine; Tanner, William; Hill, Arnold
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. seamusmchugh@rcsi.ie
Citation:
World J Surg. 2011 Mar;35(3):487-92.
Journal:
World journal of surgery
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207183
DOI:
10.1007/s00268-010-0934-1
PubMed ID:
21207028
Abstract:
INTRODUCTION: Irish general surgery faces a recruitment crisis with only 87 of 145 (60%) basic surgical training (BST) places filled in 2009. We assessed basic surgical trainees to identify objective, and potentially modifiable, factors that influence ultimate recruitment into a general surgical career. METHODS: Candidates commencing BST training during a 5-year period between 2004 and 2008 were included in a quantitative study. In addition a total of 2,536 candidates, representing all those who commenced surgical training in Ireland since 1960 were identified through the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) database and invited to complete an online survey. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 15, with p < 0.05 considered significant. RESULTS: During the 5-year quantitative study period there were 381 BST trainees. Gender was a significant predictor of career choice with women more likely to ultimately choose a nonsurgical career after initial surgical training (p = 0.049). Passing surgical membership examinations (MRCS) also was predictive of remaining in surgery (p = 0.005). Training region was not a significant predictor of ultimate career choice. There were 418 survey respondents. The influence of role models was most commonly cited as influencing candidates in choosing to commence surgical training. Candidates who rated "academic opportunity" (p = 0.023) and "intellectual challenge" (p = 0.047) as factors that influenced their decision to commence surgical training were more likely to ultimately continue their careers in a surgical speciality. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes the career pathway of surgical trainees and confirms the importance of academic achievement in discriminating between candidates applying for surgical training schemes.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; *Career Choice; *Career Mobility; Evaluation Studies as Topic; Female; General Surgery/*education/manpower; Humans; Internship and Residency/*statistics & numerical data; Ireland; Male; Physicians, Women; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Specialties, Surgical/education/manpower
ISSN:
1432-2323 (Electronic); 0364-2313 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcHugh, Seamusen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCorrigan, Marken_GB
dc.contributor.authorSheikh, Atharen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLehane, Elaineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTanner, Williamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHill, Arnolden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:01:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:01:20Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:01:20Z-
dc.identifier.citationWorld J Surg. 2011 Mar;35(3):487-92.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1432-2323 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0364-2313 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21207028en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00268-010-0934-1en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207183-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Irish general surgery faces a recruitment crisis with only 87 of 145 (60%) basic surgical training (BST) places filled in 2009. We assessed basic surgical trainees to identify objective, and potentially modifiable, factors that influence ultimate recruitment into a general surgical career. METHODS: Candidates commencing BST training during a 5-year period between 2004 and 2008 were included in a quantitative study. In addition a total of 2,536 candidates, representing all those who commenced surgical training in Ireland since 1960 were identified through the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) database and invited to complete an online survey. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 15, with p < 0.05 considered significant. RESULTS: During the 5-year quantitative study period there were 381 BST trainees. Gender was a significant predictor of career choice with women more likely to ultimately choose a nonsurgical career after initial surgical training (p = 0.049). Passing surgical membership examinations (MRCS) also was predictive of remaining in surgery (p = 0.005). Training region was not a significant predictor of ultimate career choice. There were 418 survey respondents. The influence of role models was most commonly cited as influencing candidates in choosing to commence surgical training. Candidates who rated "academic opportunity" (p = 0.023) and "intellectual challenge" (p = 0.047) as factors that influenced their decision to commence surgical training were more likely to ultimately continue their careers in a surgical speciality. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes the career pathway of surgical trainees and confirms the importance of academic achievement in discriminating between candidates applying for surgical training schemes.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Career Choiceen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Career Mobilityen_GB
dc.subject.meshEvaluation Studies as Topicen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshGeneral Surgery/*education/manpoweren_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInternship and Residency/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshPhysicians, Womenen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSpecialties, Surgical/education/manpoweren_GB
dc.titleFactors influencing career choice after initial training in surgery.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. seamusmchugh@rcsi.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalWorld journal of surgeryen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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