Hospital clinicians' information behaviour and attitudes towards the 'Clinical Informationist': an Irish survey.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207164
Title:
Hospital clinicians' information behaviour and attitudes towards the 'Clinical Informationist': an Irish survey.
Authors:
Flynn, Maura G; McGuinness, Claire
Affiliation:
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Department of Medicine, Beaumont Hospital, , Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Health Info Libr J. 2011 Mar;28(1):23-32. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-1842.2010.00917.x. , Epub 2010 Oct 13.
Journal:
Health information and libraries journal
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207164
DOI:
10.1111/j.1471-1842.2010.00917.x
PubMed ID:
21314891
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Hospital clinicians are increasingly expected to practice evidence-based medicine (EBM) in order to minimize medical errors and ensure quality patient care, but experience obstacles to information-seeking. The introduction of a Clinical Informationist (CI) is explored as a possible solution. AIMS: This paper investigates the self-perceived information needs, behaviour and skill levels of clinicians in two Irish public hospitals. It also explores clinicians' perceptions and attitudes to the introduction of a CI into their clinical teams. METHODS: A questionnaire survey approach was utilised for this study, with 22 clinicians in two hospitals. Data analysis was conducted using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Analysis showed that clinicians experience diverse information needs for patient care, and that barriers such as time constraints and insufficient access to resources hinder their information-seeking. Findings also showed that clinicians struggle to fit information-seeking into their working day, regularly seeking to answer patient-related queries outside of working hours. Attitudes towards the concept of a CI were predominantly positive. CONCLUSION: This paper highlights the factors that characterise and limit hospital clinicians' information-seeking, and suggests the CI as a potentially useful addition to the clinical team, to help them to resolve their information needs for patient care.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; *Attitude of Health Personnel; Decision Support Systems, Clinical/*organization & administration; Female; *Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Ireland; Libraries, Hospital/organization & administration; Male; Medical Staff, Hospital/*statistics & numerical data; Middle Aged; Physician's Practice Patterns/*statistics & numerical data; Questionnaires
ISSN:
1471-1842 (Electronic); 1471-1834 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, Maura Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGuinness, Claireen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:00:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:00:49Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:00:49Z-
dc.identifier.citationHealth Info Libr J. 2011 Mar;28(1):23-32. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-1842.2010.00917.x. , Epub 2010 Oct 13.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1471-1842 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1471-1834 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21314891en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1471-1842.2010.00917.xen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207164-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Hospital clinicians are increasingly expected to practice evidence-based medicine (EBM) in order to minimize medical errors and ensure quality patient care, but experience obstacles to information-seeking. The introduction of a Clinical Informationist (CI) is explored as a possible solution. AIMS: This paper investigates the self-perceived information needs, behaviour and skill levels of clinicians in two Irish public hospitals. It also explores clinicians' perceptions and attitudes to the introduction of a CI into their clinical teams. METHODS: A questionnaire survey approach was utilised for this study, with 22 clinicians in two hospitals. Data analysis was conducted using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Analysis showed that clinicians experience diverse information needs for patient care, and that barriers such as time constraints and insufficient access to resources hinder their information-seeking. Findings also showed that clinicians struggle to fit information-seeking into their working day, regularly seeking to answer patient-related queries outside of working hours. Attitudes towards the concept of a CI were predominantly positive. CONCLUSION: This paper highlights the factors that characterise and limit hospital clinicians' information-seeking, and suggests the CI as a potentially useful addition to the clinical team, to help them to resolve their information needs for patient care.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Attitude of Health Personnelen_GB
dc.subject.meshDecision Support Systems, Clinical/*organization & administrationen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIrelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshLibraries, Hospital/organization & administrationen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMedical Staff, Hospital/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.titleHospital clinicians' information behaviour and attitudes towards the 'Clinical Informationist': an Irish survey.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentRoyal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Department of Medicine, Beaumont Hospital, , Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalHealth information and libraries journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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