Proximal myopathy in lacto-vegetarian Asian patients responding to Vitamin D and calcium supplement therapy - two case reports and review of the literature.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207090
Title:
Proximal myopathy in lacto-vegetarian Asian patients responding to Vitamin D and calcium supplement therapy - two case reports and review of the literature.
Authors:
Thabit, Hood; Barry, Maurice; Sreenan, Seamus; Smith, Diarmuid
Affiliation:
Academic Department of Endocrinology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland., hoodthabit@physicians.ie.
Citation:
J Med Case Reports. 2011 May 13;5:178.
Journal:
Journal of medical case reports
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207090
DOI:
10.1186/1752-1947-5-178
PubMed ID:
21569505
Abstract:
INTRODUCTION: Severe proximal myopathy can occasionally be the first presenting complaint of patients with osteomalacia. This may lead to investigations and misdiagnosis of a neuromuscular disease, rather than a metabolic bone disease. CASE PRESENTATIONS: We present here two cases of severe proximal myopathy in patients who were both of South Asian origin and lacto-vegetarians: a 31-year-old Indian man and a 34-year-old Indian woman. In both cases, their clinical symptoms fully resolved following vitamin D and calcium replacement therapy. These patients were at risk of osteomalacia due to their dietary intake and ethnicity. The role of dietary intake and sunlight exposure in the development of osteomalacia in certain ethnic groups living in Western Europe is reviewed here. CONCLUSION: These two cases emphasize the importance of recognizing osteomalacia in at-risk individuals, as the condition is reversible and easily treated with vitamin D and calcium supplementation. It may also help avoid prolonged and unnecessary investigations of these patients.
Language:
eng
ISSN:
1752-1947 (Electronic); 1752-1947 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThabit, Hooden_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Mauriceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSreenan, Seamusen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Diarmuiden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T09:58:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T09:58:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T09:58:59Z-
dc.identifier.citationJ Med Case Reports. 2011 May 13;5:178.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1752-1947 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1752-1947 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21569505en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1752-1947-5-178en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207090-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Severe proximal myopathy can occasionally be the first presenting complaint of patients with osteomalacia. This may lead to investigations and misdiagnosis of a neuromuscular disease, rather than a metabolic bone disease. CASE PRESENTATIONS: We present here two cases of severe proximal myopathy in patients who were both of South Asian origin and lacto-vegetarians: a 31-year-old Indian man and a 34-year-old Indian woman. In both cases, their clinical symptoms fully resolved following vitamin D and calcium replacement therapy. These patients were at risk of osteomalacia due to their dietary intake and ethnicity. The role of dietary intake and sunlight exposure in the development of osteomalacia in certain ethnic groups living in Western Europe is reviewed here. CONCLUSION: These two cases emphasize the importance of recognizing osteomalacia in at-risk individuals, as the condition is reversible and easily treated with vitamin D and calcium supplementation. It may also help avoid prolonged and unnecessary investigations of these patients.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.titleProximal myopathy in lacto-vegetarian Asian patients responding to Vitamin D and calcium supplement therapy - two case reports and review of the literature.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAcademic Department of Endocrinology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland., hoodthabit@physicians.ie.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of medical case reportsen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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