Analysis of margin index as a method for predicting residual disease after breast-conserving surgery in a European cancer center.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207079
Title:
Analysis of margin index as a method for predicting residual disease after breast-conserving surgery in a European cancer center.
Authors:
Bolger, Jarlath C; Solon, Jacqueline G; Power, Colm; Hill, Arnold D K
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland,, jarlathbolger@yahoo.co.uk.
Citation:
Ann Surg Oncol. 2012 Jan;19(1):207-11. Epub 2011 Jun 3.
Journal:
Annals of surgical oncology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207079
DOI:
10.1245/s10434-011-1810-4
PubMed ID:
21638098
Abstract:
INTRODUCTION: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS), followed by appropriate adjuvant therapies is established as a standard treatment option for women with early-stage invasive breast cancers. A number of factors have been shown to correlate with local and regional disease recurrence. Although margin status is a strong predictor of disease recurrence, consensus is yet to be established on the optimum margin necessary. Margenthaler et al. recently proposed the use of a "margin index," combining tumor size and margin status as a predictor of residual disease after BCS. We applied this new predictive tool to a population of patients with primary breast cancer who presented to a symptomatic breast unit to determine its suitability in predicting those who require reexcision surgery. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of our breast cancer database from January 1, 2000 to June 30, 2010 was performed, including all patients who underwent BCS. Of 531 patients who underwent BCS, 27.1% (144/531) required further reexcision procedures, and 55 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Margin index was calculated as: margin index = closest margin (mm)/tumor size (mm) x 100, with index >5 considered optimum. RESULTS: Of the 55 patients included, 31% (17/55) had residual disease. Fisher's exact test showed margin index not to be a significant predictor of residual disease on reexcision specimen (P = 0.57). Of note, a significantly higher proportion of our patients presented with T2/3 tumors (60% vs. 38%). CONCLUSIONS: Although an apparently elegant tool for predicting residual disease after BCS, we have shown that it is not applicable to a symptomatic breast unit in Ireland.
Language:
eng
ISSN:
1534-4681 (Electronic); 1068-9265 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBolger, Jarlath Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSolon, Jacqueline Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPower, Colmen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHill, Arnold D Ken_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T09:58:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T09:58:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T09:58:43Z-
dc.identifier.citationAnn Surg Oncol. 2012 Jan;19(1):207-11. Epub 2011 Jun 3.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1534-4681 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1068-9265 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21638098en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1245/s10434-011-1810-4en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207079-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS), followed by appropriate adjuvant therapies is established as a standard treatment option for women with early-stage invasive breast cancers. A number of factors have been shown to correlate with local and regional disease recurrence. Although margin status is a strong predictor of disease recurrence, consensus is yet to be established on the optimum margin necessary. Margenthaler et al. recently proposed the use of a "margin index," combining tumor size and margin status as a predictor of residual disease after BCS. We applied this new predictive tool to a population of patients with primary breast cancer who presented to a symptomatic breast unit to determine its suitability in predicting those who require reexcision surgery. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of our breast cancer database from January 1, 2000 to June 30, 2010 was performed, including all patients who underwent BCS. Of 531 patients who underwent BCS, 27.1% (144/531) required further reexcision procedures, and 55 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Margin index was calculated as: margin index = closest margin (mm)/tumor size (mm) x 100, with index >5 considered optimum. RESULTS: Of the 55 patients included, 31% (17/55) had residual disease. Fisher's exact test showed margin index not to be a significant predictor of residual disease on reexcision specimen (P = 0.57). Of note, a significantly higher proportion of our patients presented with T2/3 tumors (60% vs. 38%). CONCLUSIONS: Although an apparently elegant tool for predicting residual disease after BCS, we have shown that it is not applicable to a symptomatic breast unit in Ireland.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.titleAnalysis of margin index as a method for predicting residual disease after breast-conserving surgery in a European cancer center.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland,, jarlathbolger@yahoo.co.uk.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of surgical oncologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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