Patient and surgeon factors are associated with the use of laparoscopy in appendicitis.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207065
Title:
Patient and surgeon factors are associated with the use of laparoscopy in appendicitis.
Authors:
McCartan, D P; Fleming, F J; Hill, A D K
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Beaumont Hospital, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland,, Dublin, Ireland Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, University, of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA.
Citation:
Colorectal Dis. 2012 Feb;14(2):243-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1463-1318.2011.02597.x.
Journal:
Colorectal disease : the official journal of the Association of Coloproctology of, Great Britain and Ireland
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207065
DOI:
10.1111/j.1463-1318.2011.02597.x
PubMed ID:
21689291
Abstract:
Aim The use of a minimally invasive approach to treat appendicitis has yet to be universally accepted. The objective of this study was to examine recent trends in Ireland in the surgical management of acute appendicitis. Method Data were obtained from the Irish Hospital In-Patient Enquiry system for patients discharged with a diagnosis of appendicitis between 1999 and 2007. An anonymous postal survey was sent to all general surgeons of consultant and registrar level in Ireland to assess current attitudes to the use of laparoscopic appendectomy. Results The use of laparoscopic appendectomy increased throughout the study and was the most common approach for appendectomy in 2007. Multivariate analysis revealed age under 50 years (OR = 1.51), female sex (OR = 2.84) and residence in high-density population areas (OR = 4.15) as predictive factors for undergoing laparoscopic appendectomy in the most recent year of the study. While 97% of surgeons reported current use of laparoscopy in patients with acute right iliac fossa pain, in most cases it was selective. Surgeons in university teaching hospitals (42 of 77; 55%) were more likely to report using laparoscopic appendectomy for all cases of appendicitis than those in regional (six of 23; 26%) or general (13 of 53; 25%) hospitals (P = 0.048). Conclusion This study has demonstrated a significant increase in laparoscopic appendectomy, yet a variety of patient and surgeon factors contribute to the choice of procedure. Differences in the perception of benefit of the laparoscopic approach amongst surgeons appears to be an important factor in determining the operative approach for appendectomy.
Language:
eng
ISSN:
1463-1318 (Electronic); 1462-8910 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcCartan, D Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFleming, F Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHill, A D Ken_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T09:58:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T09:58:25Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T09:58:25Z-
dc.identifier.citationColorectal Dis. 2012 Feb;14(2):243-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1463-1318.2011.02597.x.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1463-1318 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1462-8910 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21689291en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1463-1318.2011.02597.xen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207065-
dc.description.abstractAim The use of a minimally invasive approach to treat appendicitis has yet to be universally accepted. The objective of this study was to examine recent trends in Ireland in the surgical management of acute appendicitis. Method Data were obtained from the Irish Hospital In-Patient Enquiry system for patients discharged with a diagnosis of appendicitis between 1999 and 2007. An anonymous postal survey was sent to all general surgeons of consultant and registrar level in Ireland to assess current attitudes to the use of laparoscopic appendectomy. Results The use of laparoscopic appendectomy increased throughout the study and was the most common approach for appendectomy in 2007. Multivariate analysis revealed age under 50 years (OR = 1.51), female sex (OR = 2.84) and residence in high-density population areas (OR = 4.15) as predictive factors for undergoing laparoscopic appendectomy in the most recent year of the study. While 97% of surgeons reported current use of laparoscopy in patients with acute right iliac fossa pain, in most cases it was selective. Surgeons in university teaching hospitals (42 of 77; 55%) were more likely to report using laparoscopic appendectomy for all cases of appendicitis than those in regional (six of 23; 26%) or general (13 of 53; 25%) hospitals (P = 0.048). Conclusion This study has demonstrated a significant increase in laparoscopic appendectomy, yet a variety of patient and surgeon factors contribute to the choice of procedure. Differences in the perception of benefit of the laparoscopic approach amongst surgeons appears to be an important factor in determining the operative approach for appendectomy.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.titlePatient and surgeon factors are associated with the use of laparoscopy in appendicitis.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Beaumont Hospital, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland,, Dublin, Ireland Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, University, of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalColorectal disease : the official journal of the Association of Coloproctology of, Great Britain and Irelanden_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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