Impaired information processing speed and attention allocation in multiple sclerosis patients versus controls: a high-density EEG study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207019
Title:
Impaired information processing speed and attention allocation in multiple sclerosis patients versus controls: a high-density EEG study.
Authors:
Whelan, R; Lonergan, R; Kiiski, H; Nolan, H; Kinsella, K; Hutchinson, M; Tubridy, N; Reilly, R B
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, University College, Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. Robert.whelan@tcd.ie
Citation:
J Neurol Sci. 2010 Jun 15;293(1-2):45-50.
Journal:
Journal of the neurological sciences
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/207019
DOI:
10.1016/j.jns.2010.03.010
PubMed ID:
20399448
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: The no-go P3a is a variant of the P300 event-related potential (ERP) that indexes speed of information processing and attention allocation. The aim of this study was to compare ERP findings with results from the paced auditory serial addition test (PASAT) and to quantify latency, amplitude and topographical differences in P3a ERP components between multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and controls. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seventy-four subjects (20 relapsing remitting (RRMS) patients, 20 secondary progressive (SPMS) patients and 34 controls) completed a three-stimulus oddball paradigm (target, standard, and non-target). Subjects participated in separate visual and auditory tasks while data were recorded from 134 EEG channels. Latency differences were tested using an ANCOVA. Topographical differences were tested using statistical parametric mapping. RESULTS: Visual P3a amplitude correlated with PASAT score in all MS patients over frontal and parietal areas. There were significant differences in latency, amplitude, and topography between MS patients and controls in the visual condition. RRMS and SPMS patients differed in visual P3a latency and amplitude at frontal and parietal scalp regions. In the auditory condition, there were latency differences between MS patients and controls only over the parietal region. CONCLUSION: The present results demonstrate that information processing speed and attention allocation are impaired in MS.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Acoustic Stimulation/methods; Adult; Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/*etiology; Cognition Disorders/*etiology; Electroencephalography/methods; Event-Related Potentials, P300/physiology; Female; Humans; Male; Mental Processes/*physiology; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis/*complications; Neuropsychological Tests; Numerical Analysis, Computer-Assisted; Photic Stimulation/methods; Reaction Time/*physiology
ISSN:
1878-5883 (Electronic); 0022-510X (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWhelan, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorLonergan, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorKiiski, Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKinsella, Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorTubridy, Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReilly, R Ben_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T10:28:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-01T10:28:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-01T10:28:22Z-
dc.identifier.citationJ Neurol Sci. 2010 Jun 15;293(1-2):45-50.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1878-5883 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0022-510X (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20399448en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jns.2010.03.010en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/207019-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The no-go P3a is a variant of the P300 event-related potential (ERP) that indexes speed of information processing and attention allocation. The aim of this study was to compare ERP findings with results from the paced auditory serial addition test (PASAT) and to quantify latency, amplitude and topographical differences in P3a ERP components between multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and controls. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Seventy-four subjects (20 relapsing remitting (RRMS) patients, 20 secondary progressive (SPMS) patients and 34 controls) completed a three-stimulus oddball paradigm (target, standard, and non-target). Subjects participated in separate visual and auditory tasks while data were recorded from 134 EEG channels. Latency differences were tested using an ANCOVA. Topographical differences were tested using statistical parametric mapping. RESULTS: Visual P3a amplitude correlated with PASAT score in all MS patients over frontal and parietal areas. There were significant differences in latency, amplitude, and topography between MS patients and controls in the visual condition. RRMS and SPMS patients differed in visual P3a latency and amplitude at frontal and parietal scalp regions. In the auditory condition, there were latency differences between MS patients and controls only over the parietal region. CONCLUSION: The present results demonstrate that information processing speed and attention allocation are impaired in MS.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAcoustic Stimulation/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAttention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/*etiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders/*etiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshElectroencephalography/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshEvent-Related Potentials, P300/physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMental Processes/*physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshMultiple Sclerosis/*complicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Testsen_GB
dc.subject.meshNumerical Analysis, Computer-Assisteden_GB
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulation/methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshReaction Time/*physiologyen_GB
dc.titleImpaired information processing speed and attention allocation in multiple sclerosis patients versus controls: a high-density EEG study.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neurology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, University College, Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. Robert.whelan@tcd.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the neurological sciencesen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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