Are we prepared for a growing population? Morbid obesity and its implications in Irish emergency departments.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206595
Title:
Are we prepared for a growing population? Morbid obesity and its implications in Irish emergency departments.
Affiliation:
Emergency Medicine Registrar, Connolly Hospital, Blanchardstown, Dublin,, Leinster, Ireland.
Citation:
Eur J Emerg Med. 2011 Aug 22.
Journal:
European journal of emergency medicine : official journal of the European Society, for Emergency Medicine
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206595
DOI:
10.1097/MEJ.0b013e3283499311
PubMed ID:
21862929
Abstract:
Two percent of the Irish population is morbidly obese with this figure expected to rise significantly. This survey aimed to establish the present logistical capacity of Irish emergency departments (EDs) to adequately cater for the bariatric patients. A telephone survey was carried out of 37 health service executive EDs over a 5-day period in October 2008. Questions were posed to the departmental lead nurse regarding facilities (Supplemental digital content 1). No ED had adequate facilities. Two of 37 units questioned had on-site hoists designed to lift patients of more than 170 kg. Four departments had rapid access to mattresses within the hospital and three of these four had access to beds and trolleys for weighing patients. Two percent of the Irish population is morbidly obese with this figure expected to rise significantly to more than 150 kg. One department had access to commodes, chairs, wheelchairs and trolleys from inpatient services. All departments had extra-wide blood pressure cuffs and 12 had a difficult airways trolley. Necessary infrastructure and equipment for bariatric patients is deficient in the majority of Irish EDs.
Language:
ENG
ISSN:
1473-5695 (Electronic); 0969-9546 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:22:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:22:32Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:22:32Z-
dc.identifier.citationEur J Emerg Med. 2011 Aug 22.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1473-5695 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0969-9546 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21862929en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MEJ.0b013e3283499311en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206595-
dc.description.abstractTwo percent of the Irish population is morbidly obese with this figure expected to rise significantly. This survey aimed to establish the present logistical capacity of Irish emergency departments (EDs) to adequately cater for the bariatric patients. A telephone survey was carried out of 37 health service executive EDs over a 5-day period in October 2008. Questions were posed to the departmental lead nurse regarding facilities (Supplemental digital content 1). No ED had adequate facilities. Two of 37 units questioned had on-site hoists designed to lift patients of more than 170 kg. Four departments had rapid access to mattresses within the hospital and three of these four had access to beds and trolleys for weighing patients. Two percent of the Irish population is morbidly obese with this figure expected to rise significantly to more than 150 kg. One department had access to commodes, chairs, wheelchairs and trolleys from inpatient services. All departments had extra-wide blood pressure cuffs and 12 had a difficult airways trolley. Necessary infrastructure and equipment for bariatric patients is deficient in the majority of Irish EDs.en_GB
dc.language.isoENGen_GB
dc.titleAre we prepared for a growing population? Morbid obesity and its implications in Irish emergency departments.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEmergency Medicine Registrar, Connolly Hospital, Blanchardstown, Dublin,, Leinster, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of emergency medicine : official journal of the European Society, for Emergency Medicineen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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