Temporal structure of first-year courses and success at course exams: comparison of traditional continual and block delivery of anatomy and chemistry courses.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206373
Title:
Temporal structure of first-year courses and success at course exams: comparison of traditional continual and block delivery of anatomy and chemistry courses.
Authors:
Salopek, Daniela; Lovric, Jasna; Hren, Darko; Marusic, Ana
Affiliation:
Department of Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Sisters of Mercy University, Hospital, Zagreb, Croatia.
Citation:
Croat Med J. 2009 Feb;50(1):61-8.
Journal:
Croatian medical journal
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206373
PubMed ID:
19260146
Abstract:
AIM: To evaluate students' academic success at delivered in a traditional continual course, spread over the two semesters, or in alternating course blocks. METHOD: We analyzed the data on exam grades for Anatomy and Chemistry courses in the first year of the curriculum for academic year 2001/02, with the traditional continual delivery of the courses (n=253 for chemistry and n=243 for anatomy), and academic year 2003/04, with block delivery of the courses (n=255 for Chemistry and n=260 for Anatomy). Grades from the final examination were analyzed only for students who sat the exam at the first available exam term and passed the course. For the Anatomy block course, grades at 2 interim written tests and 2 parts of the final exam (practical stage exam and oral exam) in each block were analyzed for students who passed all interim tests and the final exam. RESULTS: There were no differences between two types of course delivery in the number of students passing the final examination at first attempt. There was a decrease in passing percentage for the two Anatomy block course student groups in 2003/04 (56% passing students in block 1 vs 40% in block 2, P=0.014). There was an increase in the average grades from 2001/02 to 2003/04 academic year due to an increase in Chemistry grades (F1,399=18.4, P<0.001, 2 x 2 ANOVA). There was no effect of the sequence of their delivery (F1,206=1.8, P=0.182, 2 x 2 ANOVA). There was also a significant difference in grades on interim assessments of Anatomy when it was delivered in the block format (F3,85=28.8, P<0.001, between-within subjects 2 x 4 ANOVA). CONCLUSIONS: The type of course delivery was not associated with significant differences in student academic success in Anatomy and Chemistry courses in the medical curriculum. Students can successfully pass these courses when they are delivered either in a continual, whole year format or in a condensed time format of a course block, regardless of the number and type of courses preceding the block course.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Anatomy/*education; Chemistry, Physical/*education; Croatia; *Curriculum; *Educational Measurement; Humans; Schools, Medical; Teaching/methods
ISSN:
1332-8166 (Electronic); 0353-9504 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSalopek, Danielaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLovric, Jasnaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHren, Darkoen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMarusic, Anaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:38:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:38:20Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:38:20Z-
dc.identifier.citationCroat Med J. 2009 Feb;50(1):61-8.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1332-8166 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0353-9504 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19260146en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206373-
dc.description.abstractAIM: To evaluate students' academic success at delivered in a traditional continual course, spread over the two semesters, or in alternating course blocks. METHOD: We analyzed the data on exam grades for Anatomy and Chemistry courses in the first year of the curriculum for academic year 2001/02, with the traditional continual delivery of the courses (n=253 for chemistry and n=243 for anatomy), and academic year 2003/04, with block delivery of the courses (n=255 for Chemistry and n=260 for Anatomy). Grades from the final examination were analyzed only for students who sat the exam at the first available exam term and passed the course. For the Anatomy block course, grades at 2 interim written tests and 2 parts of the final exam (practical stage exam and oral exam) in each block were analyzed for students who passed all interim tests and the final exam. RESULTS: There were no differences between two types of course delivery in the number of students passing the final examination at first attempt. There was a decrease in passing percentage for the two Anatomy block course student groups in 2003/04 (56% passing students in block 1 vs 40% in block 2, P=0.014). There was an increase in the average grades from 2001/02 to 2003/04 academic year due to an increase in Chemistry grades (F1,399=18.4, P<0.001, 2 x 2 ANOVA). There was no effect of the sequence of their delivery (F1,206=1.8, P=0.182, 2 x 2 ANOVA). There was also a significant difference in grades on interim assessments of Anatomy when it was delivered in the block format (F3,85=28.8, P<0.001, between-within subjects 2 x 4 ANOVA). CONCLUSIONS: The type of course delivery was not associated with significant differences in student academic success in Anatomy and Chemistry courses in the medical curriculum. Students can successfully pass these courses when they are delivered either in a continual, whole year format or in a condensed time format of a course block, regardless of the number and type of courses preceding the block course.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnatomy/*educationen_GB
dc.subject.meshChemistry, Physical/*educationen_GB
dc.subject.meshCroatiaen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Curriculumen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Educational Measurementen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshSchools, Medicalen_GB
dc.subject.meshTeaching/methodsen_GB
dc.titleTemporal structure of first-year courses and success at course exams: comparison of traditional continual and block delivery of anatomy and chemistry courses.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Sisters of Mercy University, Hospital, Zagreb, Croatia.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalCroatian medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.