Listeria monocytogenes as a vector for anti-cancer therapies.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206368
Title:
Listeria monocytogenes as a vector for anti-cancer therapies.
Authors:
Tangney, Mark; Gahan, Cormac G M
Affiliation:
Cork Cancer Research Centre, Mercy University Hospital, University College Cork, , Ireland.
Citation:
Curr Gene Ther. 2010 Feb;10(1):46-55.
Journal:
Current gene therapy
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206368
PubMed ID:
20158470
Abstract:
The intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes represents a promising therapeutic vector for the delivery of DNA, RNA or protein to cancer cells or to prime immune responses against tumour-specific antigens. A number of biological properties make L. monocytogenes a promising platform for development as a vector for either gene therapy or as an anti-cancer vaccine vector. L. monocytogenes is particularly efficient in mediating internalization into host cells. Once inside cells, the bacterium produces specific virulence factors which lyse the vaculolar membrane and allow escape into the cytoplasm. Once in the cytosol, L. monocytogenes is capable of actin-based motility and cell-to-cell spread without an extracellular phase. The cytoplasmic location of L. monocytogenes is significant as this potentiates entry of antigens into the MHC Class I antigen processing pathway leading to priming of specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The cytoplasmic location is also beneficial for the delivery of DNA (bactofection) by L. monocytogenes whilst cell-to-cell spread may facilitate access of the vector to cells throughout the tumour. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of L. monocytogenes for intracellular gene or protein delivery in vitro and in vivo, and this vector has also displayed safety and efficacy in clinical trial. Here, we review the features of the L. monocytogenes host-pathogen interaction that make this bacterium such an attractive candidate with which to induce appropriate therapeutic responses. We focus primarily upon work that has led to attenuation of the pathogen, demonstrated DNA, RNA or protein delivery to tumour cells as well as research that shows the efficacy of L. monocytogenes as a vector for tumour-specific vaccine delivery.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/*therapeutic use; *Drug Delivery Systems; Genetic Vectors; Humans; Listeria monocytogenes/genetics/*physiology; Neoplasms/*drug therapy
ISSN:
1875-5631 (Electronic); 1566-5232 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTangney, Marken_GB
dc.contributor.authorGahan, Cormac G Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:38:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:38:49Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:38:49Z-
dc.identifier.citationCurr Gene Ther. 2010 Feb;10(1):46-55.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1875-5631 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1566-5232 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20158470en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206368-
dc.description.abstractThe intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes represents a promising therapeutic vector for the delivery of DNA, RNA or protein to cancer cells or to prime immune responses against tumour-specific antigens. A number of biological properties make L. monocytogenes a promising platform for development as a vector for either gene therapy or as an anti-cancer vaccine vector. L. monocytogenes is particularly efficient in mediating internalization into host cells. Once inside cells, the bacterium produces specific virulence factors which lyse the vaculolar membrane and allow escape into the cytoplasm. Once in the cytosol, L. monocytogenes is capable of actin-based motility and cell-to-cell spread without an extracellular phase. The cytoplasmic location of L. monocytogenes is significant as this potentiates entry of antigens into the MHC Class I antigen processing pathway leading to priming of specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The cytoplasmic location is also beneficial for the delivery of DNA (bactofection) by L. monocytogenes whilst cell-to-cell spread may facilitate access of the vector to cells throughout the tumour. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of L. monocytogenes for intracellular gene or protein delivery in vitro and in vivo, and this vector has also displayed safety and efficacy in clinical trial. Here, we review the features of the L. monocytogenes host-pathogen interaction that make this bacterium such an attractive candidate with which to induce appropriate therapeutic responses. We focus primarily upon work that has led to attenuation of the pathogen, demonstrated DNA, RNA or protein delivery to tumour cells as well as research that shows the efficacy of L. monocytogenes as a vector for tumour-specific vaccine delivery.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Drug Delivery Systemsen_GB
dc.subject.meshGenetic Vectorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshListeria monocytogenes/genetics/*physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms/*drug therapyen_GB
dc.titleListeria monocytogenes as a vector for anti-cancer therapies.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentCork Cancer Research Centre, Mercy University Hospital, University College Cork, , Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalCurrent gene therapyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-
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