Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206367
Title:
Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.
Authors:
Morrissey, David; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; Tangney, Mark
Affiliation:
Cork Cancer Research Centre, Mercy University Hospital, University College Cork, , Ireland.
Citation:
Curr Gene Ther. 2010 Feb;10(1):3-14.
Journal:
Current gene therapy
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206367
PubMed ID:
20156191
Abstract:
Challenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Animals; Bacteria/*chemistry; *Drug Delivery Systems; Genetic Engineering; Genetic Vectors/*therapeutic use; Humans; Mice; Models, Biological; Neoplasms/*drug therapy
ISSN:
1875-5631 (Electronic); 1566-5232 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, Daviden_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Gerald Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTangney, Marken_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:38:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:38:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:38:54Z-
dc.identifier.citationCurr Gene Ther. 2010 Feb;10(1):3-14.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1875-5631 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1566-5232 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20156191en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206367-
dc.description.abstractChallenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshBacteria/*chemistryen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Drug Delivery Systemsen_GB
dc.subject.meshGenetic Engineeringen_GB
dc.subject.meshGenetic Vectors/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiceen_GB
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen_GB
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms/*drug therapyen_GB
dc.titleTumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentCork Cancer Research Centre, Mercy University Hospital, University College Cork, , Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalCurrent gene therapyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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