Antimicrobial usage in an intensive care unit: a prospective analysis.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206361
Title:
Antimicrobial usage in an intensive care unit: a prospective analysis.
Authors:
Conrick-Martin, I; Buckley, A; Cooke, J; O'Riordan, F; Cahill, J; O'Croinin, D
Affiliation:
Department of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine, Mercy University Hospital,, Grenville Place, Cork. iancm25@hotmail.com
Citation:
Ir Med J. 2011 Sep;104(8):240-2.
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206361
PubMed ID:
22125878
Abstract:
Antimicrobial therapies in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) need to be appropriate in both their antimicrobial cover and duration. We performed a prospective observational study of admissions to our semi-closed ICU over a three-month period and recorded the indications for antimicrobial therapy, agents used, duration of use, changes in therapy and reasons for changes in therapy. A change in therapy was defined as the initiation or discontinuation of an antimicrobial agent. There were 51 patients admitted during the three-month study period and all received antimicrobial therapy. There were 135 changes in antimicrobial therapy. 89 (66%) were made by the ICU team and 32 (24%) were made by the primary team. Changes were made due to a deterioration or lack of clinical response in 41 (30%) cases, due to the completion of prescribed course in 36 (27%) cases, and in response to a sensitivity result in 25 (19%) cases. Prophylactic antibiotic courses (n=24) were of a duration greater than 24 hours in 15 (63%) instances. In conclusion, the majority of changes in antimicrobial therapy were not culture-based and the duration of surgical prophylaxis was in excess of current recommended guidelines.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Aged; Anti-Bacterial Agents/*therapeutic use; Antibiotic Prophylaxis; Drug Utilization Review/*methods; Female; Humans; Infection/*drug therapy; *Intensive Care Units; Male; Middle Aged; Physician's Practice Patterns/*statistics & numerical data; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Prospective Studies
ISSN:
0332-3102 (Print); 0332-3102 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorConrick-Martin, Ien_GB
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCooke, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Riordan, Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCahill, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Croinin, Den_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:38:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:38:25Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:38:25Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr Med J. 2011 Sep;104(8):240-2.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid22125878en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206361-
dc.description.abstractAntimicrobial therapies in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) need to be appropriate in both their antimicrobial cover and duration. We performed a prospective observational study of admissions to our semi-closed ICU over a three-month period and recorded the indications for antimicrobial therapy, agents used, duration of use, changes in therapy and reasons for changes in therapy. A change in therapy was defined as the initiation or discontinuation of an antimicrobial agent. There were 51 patients admitted during the three-month study period and all received antimicrobial therapy. There were 135 changes in antimicrobial therapy. 89 (66%) were made by the ICU team and 32 (24%) were made by the primary team. Changes were made due to a deterioration or lack of clinical response in 41 (30%) cases, due to the completion of prescribed course in 36 (27%) cases, and in response to a sensitivity result in 25 (19%) cases. Prophylactic antibiotic courses (n=24) were of a duration greater than 24 hours in 15 (63%) instances. In conclusion, the majority of changes in antimicrobial therapy were not culture-based and the duration of surgical prophylaxis was in excess of current recommended guidelines.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents/*therapeutic useen_GB
dc.subject.meshAntibiotic Prophylaxisen_GB
dc.subject.meshDrug Utilization Review/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfection/*drug therapyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Intensive Care Unitsen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns/*statistics & numerical dataen_GB
dc.subject.meshPractice Guidelines as Topicen_GB
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_GB
dc.titleAntimicrobial usage in an intensive care unit: a prospective analysis.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine, Mercy University Hospital,, Grenville Place, Cork. iancm25@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.