Cervical artery dissection following a turbulent flight.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206328
Title:
Cervical artery dissection following a turbulent flight.
Authors:
Quinn, Colin; Cooke, John; O'Connor, Margaret; Lyons, Declan
Affiliation:
Clinical Age Assessment Unit, Department of Medicine, Division of Ageing and, Therapeutics, Mid-Western Regional Hospital, Limerick, Ireland., colinjmquinn@yahoo.com
Citation:
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2011 Oct;82(10):995-7.
Journal:
Aviation, space, and environmental medicine
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206328
PubMed ID:
21961406
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Cervical artery dissection is a common cause of stroke in young patients without vascular risk factors and may affect the carotid or vertebral arteries. The risk of spontaneous dissection is higher in those with genetic predisposing factors while other cases may be precipitated by an event involving head or neck movement or associated with direct neck trauma. CASE REPORT: We present the case of a previously well young woman with a history of migraine who developed internal carotid artery dissection following a turbulent short-haul commercial flight while restrained using a seatbelt. DISCUSSION: We propose that repetitive flexion-hyperextension neck movements encountered during the flight were the most likely precipitant of carotid artery dissection in this case and review the therapeutic options available.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adult; *Aerospace Medicine; Aviation; Carotid Artery, Internal, Dissection/diagnosis/*etiology; Female; Humans; Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/diagnosis/etiology; Magnetic Resonance Angiography; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; *Movement; Seat Belts
ISSN:
0095-6562 (Print); 0095-6562 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Colinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCooke, Johnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Margareten_GB
dc.contributor.authorLyons, Declanen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:46:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:46:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:46:09Z-
dc.identifier.citationAviat Space Environ Med. 2011 Oct;82(10):995-7.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0095-6562 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0095-6562 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21961406en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206328-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Cervical artery dissection is a common cause of stroke in young patients without vascular risk factors and may affect the carotid or vertebral arteries. The risk of spontaneous dissection is higher in those with genetic predisposing factors while other cases may be precipitated by an event involving head or neck movement or associated with direct neck trauma. CASE REPORT: We present the case of a previously well young woman with a history of migraine who developed internal carotid artery dissection following a turbulent short-haul commercial flight while restrained using a seatbelt. DISCUSSION: We propose that repetitive flexion-hyperextension neck movements encountered during the flight were the most likely precipitant of carotid artery dissection in this case and review the therapeutic options available.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Aerospace Medicineen_GB
dc.subject.meshAviationen_GB
dc.subject.meshCarotid Artery, Internal, Dissection/diagnosis/*etiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/diagnosis/etiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Angiographyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Movementen_GB
dc.subject.meshSeat Beltsen_GB
dc.titleCervical artery dissection following a turbulent flight.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentClinical Age Assessment Unit, Department of Medicine, Division of Ageing and, Therapeutics, Mid-Western Regional Hospital, Limerick, Ireland., colinjmquinn@yahoo.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalAviation, space, and environmental medicineen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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