Xenogenic extracellular matrices as potential biomaterials for interposition grafting in urological surgery.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206285
Title:
Xenogenic extracellular matrices as potential biomaterials for interposition grafting in urological surgery.
Authors:
Davis, N F; McGuire, B B; Callanan, A; Flood, H D; McGloughlin, T M
Affiliation:
Department of Urology, Mid-Western Regional Hospital, Dooradoyle, County, Limerick, Ireland.
Citation:
J Urol. 2010 Dec;184(6):2246-53. Epub 2010 Oct 16.
Journal:
The Journal of urology
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206285
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2010.07.038
PubMed ID:
20952029
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The field of tissue engineering focuses on developing strategies for reconstructing injured, diseased, and congenitally absent tissues and organs. During the last decade urologists have benefited from remodeling and regenerative properties of bioscaffolds derived from xenogenic extracellular matrices. We comprehensively reviewed the current literature on structural and functional characteristics of xenogenic extracellular matrix grafting since it was first described in urological surgery. We also reviewed the clinical limitations, and assessed the potential for safe and effective urological application of extracellular matrix grafting in place of autogenous tissue. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed literature searches for English language publications using the PubMed(R) and MEDLINE(R) databases. Keywords included "xenogenic," "extracellular matrix" and "genitourinary tract applications." A total of 112 articles were scrutinized, of which 50 were suitable for review based on clinical relevance and importance of content. RESULTS: Since the mid 1990s xenogenic extracellular matrices have been used to successfully treat a number of pathological conditions that affect the upper and lower genitourinary tract. They are typically prepared from porcine organs such as small intestine and bladder. These organs are harvested and subjected to decellularization and sterilization techniques before surgical implantation. Bioinductive growth factors that are retained during the preparation process induce constructive tissue remodeling as the extracellular matrix is simultaneously degraded and excreted. However, recent documented concerns over durability, decreased mechanical strength and residual porcine DNA after preparation techniques have temporarily hampered the potential of extracellular matrices as a reliable replacement for genitourinary tract structures. CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular matrices are a useful alternative for successfully treating a number of urological conditions that affect the genitourinary tract. However, clinical concerns regarding mechanical limitations and biosafety need to be addressed before their long-term role in reconstructive urological surgery can be clearly established.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Animals; *Biocompatible Materials; Biomechanics; Extracellular Matrix/*transplantation; Humans; Tissue Engineering; Urologic Diseases/*surgery; Urologic Surgical Procedures/*methods
ISSN:
1527-3792 (Electronic); 0022-5347 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDavis, N Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, B Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorCallanan, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFlood, H Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGloughlin, T Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:46:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:46:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:46:53Z-
dc.identifier.citationJ Urol. 2010 Dec;184(6):2246-53. Epub 2010 Oct 16.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1527-3792 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0022-5347 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20952029en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.juro.2010.07.038en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206285-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The field of tissue engineering focuses on developing strategies for reconstructing injured, diseased, and congenitally absent tissues and organs. During the last decade urologists have benefited from remodeling and regenerative properties of bioscaffolds derived from xenogenic extracellular matrices. We comprehensively reviewed the current literature on structural and functional characteristics of xenogenic extracellular matrix grafting since it was first described in urological surgery. We also reviewed the clinical limitations, and assessed the potential for safe and effective urological application of extracellular matrix grafting in place of autogenous tissue. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed literature searches for English language publications using the PubMed(R) and MEDLINE(R) databases. Keywords included "xenogenic," "extracellular matrix" and "genitourinary tract applications." A total of 112 articles were scrutinized, of which 50 were suitable for review based on clinical relevance and importance of content. RESULTS: Since the mid 1990s xenogenic extracellular matrices have been used to successfully treat a number of pathological conditions that affect the upper and lower genitourinary tract. They are typically prepared from porcine organs such as small intestine and bladder. These organs are harvested and subjected to decellularization and sterilization techniques before surgical implantation. Bioinductive growth factors that are retained during the preparation process induce constructive tissue remodeling as the extracellular matrix is simultaneously degraded and excreted. However, recent documented concerns over durability, decreased mechanical strength and residual porcine DNA after preparation techniques have temporarily hampered the potential of extracellular matrices as a reliable replacement for genitourinary tract structures. CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular matrices are a useful alternative for successfully treating a number of urological conditions that affect the genitourinary tract. However, clinical concerns regarding mechanical limitations and biosafety need to be addressed before their long-term role in reconstructive urological surgery can be clearly established.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Biocompatible Materialsen_GB
dc.subject.meshBiomechanicsen_GB
dc.subject.meshExtracellular Matrix/*transplantationen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshTissue Engineeringen_GB
dc.subject.meshUrologic Diseases/*surgeryen_GB
dc.subject.meshUrologic Surgical Procedures/*methodsen_GB
dc.titleXenogenic extracellular matrices as potential biomaterials for interposition grafting in urological surgery.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Urology, Mid-Western Regional Hospital, Dooradoyle, County, Limerick, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of urologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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