Reference standard for serum bile acids in pregnancy.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206256
Title:
Reference standard for serum bile acids in pregnancy.
Affiliation:
Anu Research Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College, Cork, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Cork, Ireland Department of Medicine,, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Department of Biochemistry, Cork, University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
BJOG. 2012 Jan 18. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2011.03245.x.
Journal:
BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206256
DOI:
10.1111/j.1471-0528.2011.03245.x
PubMed ID:
22251417
Abstract:
Please cite this paper as: Egan N, Bartels A, Khashan A, Broadhurst D, Joyce C, O'Mullane J, O'Donoghue K. Reference standard for serum bile acids in pregnancy. BJOG 2012;00:000-000. DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2011.03245.x. Objective Obstetric cholestasis (OC) is a liver disorder characterised by pruritus and elevated serum bile acids (SBA) that affects one in 200 pregnant women. It is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes such as premature delivery and stillbirth. Mild OC is defined as SBA levels of 10-39 mumol/l, and severe OC is defined by levels >40 mumol/l. SBA levels in normal pregnancy have not been investigated. We aimed to establish reference values for SBA in healthy pregnant women across different trimesters of pregnancy. Design Cross-sectional analysis of SBA levels. Setting A large tertiary referral university teaching maternity hospital. Population Healthy pregnant women with a singleton pregnancy and a body mass index (BMI) < 40, excluding women with significant alcohol intake, history of liver disease, prior cholecystectomy and OC. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of SBA levels at 12, 20, 28 and 36 weeks of gestation, and on days 1-3 postpartum. Main outcome measures SBA levels in mumol/l. Results A total of 219 women attending for antenatal care were recruited, and SBA levels were assayed at 12, 20, 28 and 36 weeks of gestation, and up to 72 hours postpartum (n = 44-49 cases at each stage). The majority were white European women, with a median age of 30 years (range 17-46 years) and median BMI of 25 (range 18-38). Values of SBA ranged from 0.3 to 9.8 mumol/l in 216 women, with only three measurements outside this range. There were no significant changes throughout pregnancy. Conclusions SBA values in uncomplicated pregnancies are consistent, regardless of gestation, and are not elevated in pregnancy. The current reference values for the diagnosis of OC appear to be appropriate.
Language:
ENG
ISSN:
1471-0528 (Electronic); 1470-0328 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:42:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:42:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:42:02Z-
dc.identifier.citationBJOG. 2012 Jan 18. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2011.03245.x.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1471-0528 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1470-0328 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid22251417en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1471-0528.2011.03245.xen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206256-
dc.description.abstractPlease cite this paper as: Egan N, Bartels A, Khashan A, Broadhurst D, Joyce C, O'Mullane J, O'Donoghue K. Reference standard for serum bile acids in pregnancy. BJOG 2012;00:000-000. DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2011.03245.x. Objective Obstetric cholestasis (OC) is a liver disorder characterised by pruritus and elevated serum bile acids (SBA) that affects one in 200 pregnant women. It is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes such as premature delivery and stillbirth. Mild OC is defined as SBA levels of 10-39 mumol/l, and severe OC is defined by levels >40 mumol/l. SBA levels in normal pregnancy have not been investigated. We aimed to establish reference values for SBA in healthy pregnant women across different trimesters of pregnancy. Design Cross-sectional analysis of SBA levels. Setting A large tertiary referral university teaching maternity hospital. Population Healthy pregnant women with a singleton pregnancy and a body mass index (BMI) < 40, excluding women with significant alcohol intake, history of liver disease, prior cholecystectomy and OC. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of SBA levels at 12, 20, 28 and 36 weeks of gestation, and on days 1-3 postpartum. Main outcome measures SBA levels in mumol/l. Results A total of 219 women attending for antenatal care were recruited, and SBA levels were assayed at 12, 20, 28 and 36 weeks of gestation, and up to 72 hours postpartum (n = 44-49 cases at each stage). The majority were white European women, with a median age of 30 years (range 17-46 years) and median BMI of 25 (range 18-38). Values of SBA ranged from 0.3 to 9.8 mumol/l in 216 women, with only three measurements outside this range. There were no significant changes throughout pregnancy. Conclusions SBA values in uncomplicated pregnancies are consistent, regardless of gestation, and are not elevated in pregnancy. The current reference values for the diagnosis of OC appear to be appropriate.en_GB
dc.language.isoENGen_GB
dc.titleReference standard for serum bile acids in pregnancy.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAnu Research Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College, Cork, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Cork, Ireland Department of Medicine,, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Department of Biochemistry, Cork, University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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