Comparison of the T-piece resuscitator with other neonatal manual ventilation devices: A qualitative review.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206253
Title:
Comparison of the T-piece resuscitator with other neonatal manual ventilation devices: A qualitative review.
Affiliation:
Department of Neonatology, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Ireland;, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University College Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Resuscitation. 2012 Jan 4.
Journal:
Resuscitation
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206253
DOI:
10.1016/j.resuscitation.2011.12.020
PubMed ID:
22227500
Abstract:
AIM: To review the literature surrounding various aspects of T-piece resuscitator use, with particular emphasis on the evidence comparing the device to other manual ventilation devices in neonatal resuscitation. DATA SOURCES: The Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane databases were searched in April 2011. Ongoing trials were identified using www.clinicaltrials.gov and www.controlled-trials.com. Additional studies from reference lists of eligible articles were considered. All studies including T-piece resuscitator use were eligible for inclusion. RESULTS: Thirty studies were included. There were two randomised controlled trials in newborn infants comparing the devices, one of which addressed short and intermediate term morbidity and mortality outcomes and found no difference between the T-piece resuscitator and self inflating bag. From manikin studies, advantages to the T-piece resuscitator include the delivery of inflating pressures closer to predetermined target pressures with least variation, the ability to provide prolonged inflation breaths and more consistent tidal volumes. Disadvantages include a technically more difficult setup, more time required to adjust pressures during resuscitation, a larger mask leak and less ability to detect changes in compliance. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for appropriately designed randomised controlled trials in neonates to highlight the efficacy of one device over another. Until these are performed, healthcare providers should be appropriately trained in the use of the device available in their departments, and be aware of its own limitations.
Language:
ENG
ISSN:
1873-1570 (Electronic); 0300-9572 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:44:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:44:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:44:02Z-
dc.identifier.citationResuscitation. 2012 Jan 4.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1873-1570 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0300-9572 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid22227500en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.resuscitation.2011.12.020en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206253-
dc.description.abstractAIM: To review the literature surrounding various aspects of T-piece resuscitator use, with particular emphasis on the evidence comparing the device to other manual ventilation devices in neonatal resuscitation. DATA SOURCES: The Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane databases were searched in April 2011. Ongoing trials were identified using www.clinicaltrials.gov and www.controlled-trials.com. Additional studies from reference lists of eligible articles were considered. All studies including T-piece resuscitator use were eligible for inclusion. RESULTS: Thirty studies were included. There were two randomised controlled trials in newborn infants comparing the devices, one of which addressed short and intermediate term morbidity and mortality outcomes and found no difference between the T-piece resuscitator and self inflating bag. From manikin studies, advantages to the T-piece resuscitator include the delivery of inflating pressures closer to predetermined target pressures with least variation, the ability to provide prolonged inflation breaths and more consistent tidal volumes. Disadvantages include a technically more difficult setup, more time required to adjust pressures during resuscitation, a larger mask leak and less ability to detect changes in compliance. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for appropriately designed randomised controlled trials in neonates to highlight the efficacy of one device over another. Until these are performed, healthcare providers should be appropriately trained in the use of the device available in their departments, and be aware of its own limitations.en_GB
dc.language.isoENGen_GB
dc.titleComparison of the T-piece resuscitator with other neonatal manual ventilation devices: A qualitative review.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neonatology, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Ireland;, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University College Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalResuscitationen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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