Blood carbon dioxide levels and adverse outcome in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206246
Title:
Blood carbon dioxide levels and adverse outcome in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.
Authors:
Nadeem, Montasser; Murray, Deirdre; Boylan, Geraldine; Dempsey, Eugene M; Ryan, C Anthony
Affiliation:
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Cork, Ireland.
Citation:
Am J Perinatol. 2010 May;27(5):361-5. Epub 2009 Dec 10.
Journal:
American journal of perinatology
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206246
DOI:
10.1055/s-0029-1243309
PubMed ID:
20013576
Abstract:
We investigated pCO(2) patterns and the relationship between pCO(2) levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Blood gases during the first 72 hours of life were collected from 52 infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Moderate hypocapnia (pCO(2) <3.3 kPa), severe hypocapnia (pCO(2) <2.6 kPa), and hypercapnia (pCO(2) >6.6 kPa) were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months. Normocapnia was documented in 416/551 (75.5%) of samples and was present during the entire 72 hours in only 6 out of 52 infants. Mean (standard deviation) pCO(2) values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes: 5.43 (2.4) and 5.41 (2.03), respectively. There was no significant association between moderate hypocapnia, severe hypocapnia, or hypercapnia and adverse outcome (odds ratio [OR] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.49 to 6.89; OR = 3.16, CI = 0.14 to 28.45; and OR = 1.07, CI = 0.24 to 5.45, respectively). In conclusion, only one in nine newborns had normocapnia throughout the first 72 hours. Severe hypocapnia was rare and occurred only in ventilated babies. Hypercapnia and hypocapnia in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy during the first 72 hours of life were not associated with adverse outcome.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Carbon Dioxide/*adverse effects/*blood; Female; Humans; Hypercapnia/blood; Hypocapnia/blood; Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain/*blood; Infant, Newborn; Male; Pregnancy; *Pregnancy Complications; Pregnancy Outcome
ISSN:
1098-8785 (Electronic); 0735-1631 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNadeem, Montasseren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Deirdreen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoylan, Geraldineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDempsey, Eugene Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, C Anthonyen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:42:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:42:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:42:11Z-
dc.identifier.citationAm J Perinatol. 2010 May;27(5):361-5. Epub 2009 Dec 10.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1098-8785 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0735-1631 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20013576en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-0029-1243309en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206246-
dc.description.abstractWe investigated pCO(2) patterns and the relationship between pCO(2) levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Blood gases during the first 72 hours of life were collected from 52 infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Moderate hypocapnia (pCO(2) <3.3 kPa), severe hypocapnia (pCO(2) <2.6 kPa), and hypercapnia (pCO(2) >6.6 kPa) were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months. Normocapnia was documented in 416/551 (75.5%) of samples and was present during the entire 72 hours in only 6 out of 52 infants. Mean (standard deviation) pCO(2) values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes: 5.43 (2.4) and 5.41 (2.03), respectively. There was no significant association between moderate hypocapnia, severe hypocapnia, or hypercapnia and adverse outcome (odds ratio [OR] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.49 to 6.89; OR = 3.16, CI = 0.14 to 28.45; and OR = 1.07, CI = 0.24 to 5.45, respectively). In conclusion, only one in nine newborns had normocapnia throughout the first 72 hours. Severe hypocapnia was rare and occurred only in ventilated babies. Hypercapnia and hypocapnia in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy during the first 72 hours of life were not associated with adverse outcome.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshCarbon Dioxide/*adverse effects/*blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshHypercapnia/blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshHypocapnia/blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshHypoxia-Ischemia, Brain/*blooden_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Pregnancy Complicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcomeen_GB
dc.titleBlood carbon dioxide levels and adverse outcome in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNeonatal Intensive Care Unit, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Cork, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalAmerican journal of perinatologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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