Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206232
Title:
The natural history of anencephaly.
Authors:
Obeidi, Nidaa; Russell, Noirin; Higgins, John R; O'Donoghue, Keelin
Affiliation:
Anu Research Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College, Cork, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Ireland.
Citation:
Prenat Diagn. 2010 Apr;30(4):357-60.
Journal:
Prenatal diagnosis
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206232
DOI:
10.1002/pd.2490
PubMed ID:
20198650
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Early elective termination of pregnancy is the most common outcome of a diagnosis of anencephaly in developed countries. Experience and expertise with management of ongoing pregnancies is limited. We aimed to investigate the natural history of these pregnancies from diagnosis to delivery and to determine timing of death. METHOD: A retrospective review of cases of anencephaly diagnosed between 2003 and 2009 in tertiary-referral university teaching hospitals in Cork. RESULTS: The majority of cases (25/26; 96%) were diagnosed prenatally at a median gestation of 21(+2) weeks (range 13(+4)-32(+4)). The median maternal age was 30 years (range 17-41) and 50% were primigravidae. Seven pregnancies were complicated by polyhydramnios and four deliveries were complicated by shoulder dystocia. The median gestation at delivery was 35 weeks (range 22(+5)-42(+6)); 69% of labours were induced at a median gestation of 34 weeks. Six women (6/26; 23%) had a pre-labour intrauterine fetal death and nine women (9/26; 35%) had an intrapartum fetal death. Median neonatal survival time was 55 min (range 10 min to 8 days). Six parents donated neonatal organs for transplantation. CONCLUSION: This study provides useful information for health professionals caring for patients with a diagnosis of anencephaly. The majority of these infants die prior to delivery but short-term survival is possible.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Anencephaly/complications/*epidemiology/ultrasonography; Female; Fetal Death/etiology; Humans; Ireland/epidemiology; Pregnancy; Ultrasonography, Prenatal; Young Adult
ISSN:
1097-0223 (Electronic); 0197-3851 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorObeidi, Nidaaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Noirinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, John Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Donoghue, Keelinen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:43:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:43:55Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:43:55Z-
dc.identifier.citationPrenat Diagn. 2010 Apr;30(4):357-60.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1097-0223 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0197-3851 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid20198650en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pd.2490en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206232-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Early elective termination of pregnancy is the most common outcome of a diagnosis of anencephaly in developed countries. Experience and expertise with management of ongoing pregnancies is limited. We aimed to investigate the natural history of these pregnancies from diagnosis to delivery and to determine timing of death. METHOD: A retrospective review of cases of anencephaly diagnosed between 2003 and 2009 in tertiary-referral university teaching hospitals in Cork. RESULTS: The majority of cases (25/26; 96%) were diagnosed prenatally at a median gestation of 21(+2) weeks (range 13(+4)-32(+4)). The median maternal age was 30 years (range 17-41) and 50% were primigravidae. Seven pregnancies were complicated by polyhydramnios and four deliveries were complicated by shoulder dystocia. The median gestation at delivery was 35 weeks (range 22(+5)-42(+6)); 69% of labours were induced at a median gestation of 34 weeks. Six women (6/26; 23%) had a pre-labour intrauterine fetal death and nine women (9/26; 35%) had an intrapartum fetal death. Median neonatal survival time was 55 min (range 10 min to 8 days). Six parents donated neonatal organs for transplantation. CONCLUSION: This study provides useful information for health professionals caring for patients with a diagnosis of anencephaly. The majority of these infants die prior to delivery but short-term survival is possible.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAnencephaly/complications/*epidemiology/ultrasonographyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFetal Death/etiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIreland/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_GB
dc.subject.meshUltrasonography, Prenatalen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleThe natural history of anencephaly.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAnu Research Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College, Cork, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalPrenatal diagnosisen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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