The pool chlorine hypothesis and asthma among boys.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206227
Title:
The pool chlorine hypothesis and asthma among boys.
Authors:
Cotter, A; Ryan, C A
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, UCC, Cork University Maternity, Hospital, Wilton, Cork.
Citation:
Ir Med J. 2009 Mar;102(3):79-82.
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206227
PubMed ID:
19489195
Abstract:
Swimming pool sanitation has largely been concerned with the microbiological quality of pool water, which is normally treated using a number of chlorine products. Recent studies have pointed to the potential hazards of chlorine by-products to the respiratory epithelium, particularly in indoor, poorly ventilated, pools. The aim of our study was to elucidate whether chronic exposure to indoor chlorinated swimming pools was associated with an increased likelihood of the development of asthma in boys. METHODS: The subjects were boys aged between 6 and 12 years. Data was collected by means of parental responses to a standardized asthma questionnaire (ISAAC: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood), supplemented with additional questions regarding frequency of attendance, number of years attendance, whether the child is a swimming team member. The questionnaire return rate was 71/% (n = 121). 23 boys were excluded on the basis that they had asthma before they started swimming (n = 97). There was a significant association between number of years a boy had been swimming and the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months (p = 0.009; OR = 1.351; 95% CI = 1.077-1.693) and diagnosed asthma (p = 0.046; OR = 1.299; 95% CI = 1.004-1.506). The greater the number the number of years a boy had been attending an indoor, chlorinated pool, the greater the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months or "had asthma". Age, parental smoking habits and being a swimming team member had no association with any of the asthma variables examined. Swimming pool attendance may be a risk factor in asthma in boys.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Asthma/*chemically induced/*epidemiology; Child; Chlorine Compounds/*toxicity; Confidence Intervals; Cross-Sectional Studies; Environmental Exposure/*adverse effects; Humans; Ireland/epidemiology; Male; Odds Ratio; Questionnaires; Respiratory Sounds; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Smoking/adverse effects; *Swimming Pools
ISSN:
0332-3102 (Print); 0332-3102 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCotter, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, C Aen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:42:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:42:24Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:42:24Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr Med J. 2009 Mar;102(3):79-82.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid19489195en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206227-
dc.description.abstractSwimming pool sanitation has largely been concerned with the microbiological quality of pool water, which is normally treated using a number of chlorine products. Recent studies have pointed to the potential hazards of chlorine by-products to the respiratory epithelium, particularly in indoor, poorly ventilated, pools. The aim of our study was to elucidate whether chronic exposure to indoor chlorinated swimming pools was associated with an increased likelihood of the development of asthma in boys. METHODS: The subjects were boys aged between 6 and 12 years. Data was collected by means of parental responses to a standardized asthma questionnaire (ISAAC: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood), supplemented with additional questions regarding frequency of attendance, number of years attendance, whether the child is a swimming team member. The questionnaire return rate was 71/% (n = 121). 23 boys were excluded on the basis that they had asthma before they started swimming (n = 97). There was a significant association between number of years a boy had been swimming and the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months (p = 0.009; OR = 1.351; 95% CI = 1.077-1.693) and diagnosed asthma (p = 0.046; OR = 1.299; 95% CI = 1.004-1.506). The greater the number the number of years a boy had been attending an indoor, chlorinated pool, the greater the likelihood of wheezing in the last 12 months or "had asthma". Age, parental smoking habits and being a swimming team member had no association with any of the asthma variables examined. Swimming pool attendance may be a risk factor in asthma in boys.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshAsthma/*chemically induced/*epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshChlorine Compounds/*toxicityen_GB
dc.subject.meshConfidence Intervalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposure/*adverse effectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIreland/epidemiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Soundsen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSmoking/adverse effectsen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Swimming Poolsen_GB
dc.titleThe pool chlorine hypothesis and asthma among boys.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Paediatrics and Child Health, UCC, Cork University Maternity, Hospital, Wilton, Cork.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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