The use of conventional EEG for the assessment of hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy in the newborn: a review.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206217
Title:
The use of conventional EEG for the assessment of hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy in the newborn: a review.
Authors:
Walsh, B H; Murray, D M; Boylan, G B
Affiliation:
Neonatal Brain Research Group, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Wilton, Cork, , Ireland.
Citation:
Clin Neurophysiol. 2011 Jul;122(7):1284-94. Epub 2011 May 7.
Journal:
Clinical neurophysiology : official journal of the International Federation of, Clinical Neurophysiology
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206217
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2011.03.032
PubMed ID:
21550844
Abstract:
Neonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy continues to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among neonates around the globe. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, the need to accurately classify the severity of injury in the early neonatal period is of great importance. As clinical measures cannot always accurately estimate the severity early enough for treatment to be initiated, clinicians have become more dependent on conventional and amplitude integrated EEG. Despite this, there is currently no single agreed classification scheme for the neonatal EEG in hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. In this review we discuss classification schemes of neonatal background EEG, published over the past 35 years, highlighting the urgent need for a universal visual analysis scheme.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
Electroencephalography/*methods; Humans; Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain/*diagnosis/drug therapy; Infant, Newborn; Prognosis; Seizures/physiopathology; Sleep/physiology; Treatment Outcome; Wakefulness/physiology
ISSN:
1872-8952 (Electronic); 1388-2457 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, B Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurray, D Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoylan, G Ben_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:42:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:42:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:42:59Z-
dc.identifier.citationClin Neurophysiol. 2011 Jul;122(7):1284-94. Epub 2011 May 7.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1872-8952 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1388-2457 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21550844en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clinph.2011.03.032en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206217-
dc.description.abstractNeonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy continues to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among neonates around the globe. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, the need to accurately classify the severity of injury in the early neonatal period is of great importance. As clinical measures cannot always accurately estimate the severity early enough for treatment to be initiated, clinicians have become more dependent on conventional and amplitude integrated EEG. Despite this, there is currently no single agreed classification scheme for the neonatal EEG in hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. In this review we discuss classification schemes of neonatal background EEG, published over the past 35 years, highlighting the urgent need for a universal visual analysis scheme.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.meshElectroencephalography/*methodsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshHypoxia-Ischemia, Brain/*diagnosis/drug therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen_GB
dc.subject.meshSeizures/physiopathologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshSleep/physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_GB
dc.subject.meshWakefulness/physiologyen_GB
dc.titleThe use of conventional EEG for the assessment of hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy in the newborn: a review.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNeonatal Brain Research Group, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Wilton, Cork, , Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalClinical neurophysiology : official journal of the International Federation of, Clinical Neurophysiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-
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