Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease: An exploration.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206213
Title:
Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease: An exploration.
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology; Anu Research Centre; Cork University, Maternity Hospital; University College Cork; Wilton, Cork Ireland.
Citation:
Chimerism. 2011 Jul;2(3):84-85. Epub 2011 Jul 1.
Journal:
Chimerism (Print)
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206213
DOI:
10.4161/chim.2.3.17771
PubMed ID:
22163066
Abstract:
Fetal microchimerism is the study of persisting fetal cells in the mother years after pregnancy and the purported implications for her health and longevity. Due to the association between pregnancy and autoimmune disease (AID), and the preponderance of these diseases in women, laboratory studies have for years attempted to link microchimeric fetal cells with the onset of AID after pregnancy. This new study gave us the opportunity to examine for the first time if this theory could be proven clinically in a large cohort of women. By examining whether different types of delivery affected the onset of AID, we also aimed to indirectly relate this finding to fetal microchimerism. The results did suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID, with increased risks noted after caesarean section (CS) and decreased risks after abortion. This is the first epidemiological study on the risk of AID following pregnancy.
Language:
ENG
ISSN:
1938-1964 (Electronic)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:44:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:44:00Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:44:00Z-
dc.identifier.citationChimerism. 2011 Jul;2(3):84-85. Epub 2011 Jul 1.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1938-1964 (Electronic)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid22163066en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.4161/chim.2.3.17771en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206213-
dc.description.abstractFetal microchimerism is the study of persisting fetal cells in the mother years after pregnancy and the purported implications for her health and longevity. Due to the association between pregnancy and autoimmune disease (AID), and the preponderance of these diseases in women, laboratory studies have for years attempted to link microchimeric fetal cells with the onset of AID after pregnancy. This new study gave us the opportunity to examine for the first time if this theory could be proven clinically in a large cohort of women. By examining whether different types of delivery affected the onset of AID, we also aimed to indirectly relate this finding to fetal microchimerism. The results did suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID, with increased risks noted after caesarean section (CS) and decreased risks after abortion. This is the first epidemiological study on the risk of AID following pregnancy.en_GB
dc.language.isoENGen_GB
dc.titlePregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease: An exploration.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology; Anu Research Centre; Cork University, Maternity Hospital; University College Cork; Wilton, Cork Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalChimerism (Print)en_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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