Introducing random safety audits (RSA) in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206210
Title:
Introducing random safety audits (RSA) in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).
Authors:
Szymanska, M; Ryan, C A; Murphy, B P
Affiliation:
Cork University Maternity Hospital, Wilton, Cork.
Citation:
Ir Med J. 2011 Apr;104(4):114-7.
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
31-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/206210
PubMed ID:
21675094
Abstract:
Random safety audits (RSA) have been shown to be effective in improving standards of clinical practice. 19 data collection audits were performed relating to hygiene, safe prescribing, oxygen pulse oximetry monitoring and documentation in keeping with the requirements of the new Medical Practitioners Act (MPA) 2007. Hygiene audits (range from 20/25 to 21/21 80%-100%) and safe prescribing audits (range from 23/25 to 25/25 86%-100%) achieved n=25 100% compliance with unit guidelines over a 3 month period. Compliance with oxygen pulse oximetry monitoring guideline limits improved from 4/27 (15%) to 9/16 (56%). Compliance with requirement and use of Physician IMC registration number in documentation was only 10/18 (56%). RSA's led to improvements in hygiene and prescribing. Compliance with oxygen monitoring guideline limits highlighted the need for greater education. Awareness of legal requirements relating to documentation improved but this has not translated into a change in practice. RSA's can facilitate real time quality improvement in daily clinical practice.
Language:
eng
MeSH:
*Clinical Audit; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Intensive Care Units, Neonatal; *Quality Assurance, Health Care; Safety Management
ISSN:
0332-3102 (Print); 0332-3102 (Linking)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSzymanska, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, C Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, B Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-31T16:43:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-31T16:43:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-31T16:43:02Z-
dc.identifier.citationIr Med J. 2011 Apr;104(4):114-7.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Print)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102 (Linking)en_GB
dc.identifier.pmid21675094en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/206210-
dc.description.abstractRandom safety audits (RSA) have been shown to be effective in improving standards of clinical practice. 19 data collection audits were performed relating to hygiene, safe prescribing, oxygen pulse oximetry monitoring and documentation in keeping with the requirements of the new Medical Practitioners Act (MPA) 2007. Hygiene audits (range from 20/25 to 21/21 80%-100%) and safe prescribing audits (range from 23/25 to 25/25 86%-100%) achieved n=25 100% compliance with unit guidelines over a 3 month period. Compliance with oxygen pulse oximetry monitoring guideline limits improved from 4/27 (15%) to 9/16 (56%). Compliance with requirement and use of Physician IMC registration number in documentation was only 10/18 (56%). RSA's led to improvements in hygiene and prescribing. Compliance with oxygen monitoring guideline limits highlighted the need for greater education. Awareness of legal requirements relating to documentation improved but this has not translated into a change in practice. RSA's can facilitate real time quality improvement in daily clinical practice.en_GB
dc.language.isoengen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Clinical Auditen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Units, Neonatalen_GB
dc.subject.mesh*Quality Assurance, Health Careen_GB
dc.subject.meshSafety Managementen_GB
dc.titleIntroducing random safety audits (RSA) in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentCork University Maternity Hospital, Wilton, Cork.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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