Behavioural and emotional outcome of very low birth weight infants--literature review.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/205091
Title:
Behavioural and emotional outcome of very low birth weight infants--literature review.
Authors:
Hayes, Breda; Sharif, Farhana
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Midland Regional Hospital, Mullingar, Ireland. bredahayes@hotmail.com
Citation:
Behavioural and emotional outcome of very low birth weight infants--literature review. 2009, 22 (10):849-56 J. Matern. Fetal. Neonatal. Med.
Journal:
The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians
Issue Date:
Oct-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/205091
DOI:
10.1080/14767050902994507
PubMed ID:
19521926
Additional Links:
http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14767050902994507
Abstract:
To examine whether low birth weight (LBW) children are at greater risk for behavioural and emotional problems than normal birth weight children.; Electronic databases (PubMed, Google) were searched. Key search terms (LBW, emotional behavioural outcome) were used to identify possible studies. Selection of studies was limited to those including detailed assessment of behavioural and/or emotional outcome of very low birth weight or very preterm infants with normal term infants as controls, published from the year 2000 to date. A total of 20 studies were identified for inclusion in our review.; Overall studies showed a significant increase in behavioural problems in particular poor attention span, withdrawn behaviour and poorer adaptive functioning. Rates of a clinically significant neurobehavioural impairment in cases ranged from 25% to 55% with controls displaying a relatively constant rate of around 7%. Attention problems without hyperactivity (ADD) were more common than 'classical attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder' in LBW children. Only 4% of the LBW children had previously been referred to a consultant psychiatric suggesting that at present these problems are being under-recognised.; VLBW or very preterm infants are at significant risk of behavioural and emotional problems. The risk is further increased when cognitive or motor difficulties are present or when social circumstances are poor.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Case-Control Studies; Child; Cognition Disorders; Developmental Disabilities; Emotions; Humans; Infant Behavior; Infant, Newborn; Infant, Very Low Birth Weight; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Psychomotor Performance
ISSN:
1476-4954

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Bredaen
dc.contributor.authorSharif, Farhanaen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-26T15:31:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-26T15:31:08Z-
dc.date.issued2009-10-
dc.identifier.citationBehavioural and emotional outcome of very low birth weight infants--literature review. 2009, 22 (10):849-56 J. Matern. Fetal. Neonatal. Med.en
dc.identifier.issn1476-4954-
dc.identifier.pmid19521926-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14767050902994507-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/205091-
dc.description.abstractTo examine whether low birth weight (LBW) children are at greater risk for behavioural and emotional problems than normal birth weight children.-
dc.description.abstractElectronic databases (PubMed, Google) were searched. Key search terms (LBW, emotional behavioural outcome) were used to identify possible studies. Selection of studies was limited to those including detailed assessment of behavioural and/or emotional outcome of very low birth weight or very preterm infants with normal term infants as controls, published from the year 2000 to date. A total of 20 studies were identified for inclusion in our review.-
dc.description.abstractOverall studies showed a significant increase in behavioural problems in particular poor attention span, withdrawn behaviour and poorer adaptive functioning. Rates of a clinically significant neurobehavioural impairment in cases ranged from 25% to 55% with controls displaying a relatively constant rate of around 7%. Attention problems without hyperactivity (ADD) were more common than 'classical attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder' in LBW children. Only 4% of the LBW children had previously been referred to a consultant psychiatric suggesting that at present these problems are being under-recognised.-
dc.description.abstractVLBW or very preterm infants are at significant risk of behavioural and emotional problems. The risk is further increased when cognitive or motor difficulties are present or when social circumstances are poor.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14767050902994507en
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders-
dc.subject.meshDevelopmental Disabilities-
dc.subject.meshEmotions-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant Behavior-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Very Low Birth Weight-
dc.subject.meshOutcome Assessment (Health Care)-
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performance-
dc.titleBehavioural and emotional outcome of very low birth weight infants--literature review.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Paediatrics, Midland Regional Hospital, Mullingar, Ireland. bredahayes@hotmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalThe journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetriciansen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

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