Survey of the research activity, skills and training needs of Health and Social Care professionals in Ireland

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/202929
Title:
Survey of the research activity, skills and training needs of Health and Social Care professionals in Ireland
Other Titles:
Prepared by Patrick McHugh and Dr. Michael Byrne on behalf of the Health Service Executive
Authors:
Health Service Executive (HSE); Byrne, Michael ( 0000-0002-1675-9850 ) ; McHugh, Patrick
Citation:
McHugh, P. & Byrne, M. (2011). Survey of the Research Activity, Skills and Training Needs of Health and Social Care Professionals in Ireland. Dublin: Health Service Executive.
Publisher:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Issue Date:
13-Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/202929
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The first of its kind, this study profiled the level of research activity among HSCPs, their research skills and training needs, and their preferences for how their research capacity could be developed. The various HSCP bodies and discipline-specific service manager groups were requested to circulate a 31-item questionnaire to their members and staff respectively. While this process attempted to distribute the survey to the total population of 14,631 HSCPs, the number reached is likely to be lower because of the absence of an overall sampling frame for HSCPs. A total of 373 HSCPs responded, representing a response rate of 2.5%. This significantly low response rate limits the generalisability of the findings to the overall HSCP population, as does the likely strong response bias towards research active HSCPs. During the period of January – June 2011, 47.5% (n=177) of participants were engaged in research. They were involved with 542 projects consisting of 192 (35.4%) service evaluations, 229 (42.3%) research projects and 121 (22.3%) review articles. Regarding their two most recent projects, 33.7% were part of gaining an academic degree and 22.7% were funded. There was a substantial degree of coordination and cooperation among the projects sampled, with 74.7% involving some form of collaboration, while one third were part of a larger research stream. These research active participants spent on average of 13% of their working time engaged in research. Eighty four per cent and 73% of research active and inactive participants respectively indicated a desire to spend more time engaged in research. Clinical pressures and a lack of time were cited as the main barriers to engaging in research. Increased protected work time for research, more funded research posts, and greater mentorship and support for researchers were cited as the most effective facilitators of research activity. Regarding participants’ research skills, the greatest areas of reported weakness were applying for funding and publishing research. Other areas highlighted as weak were that of quantitative and qualitative research design and data analysis, and applying for ethical approval. Regarding research training, participants indicated a preference for various combinations of one-to-one mentorship, peer-based learning within research clusters and practice-based workshops. Based on the findings of this survey, a number of recommendations targeted at developing the research capacity of HSCPs are presented. At a policy level, there is a need to prioritise nominating both a national and regional HSCP managerial and research leads that sit respectively on a national and regional HSCP Research Groups. At an organisational level, there is need to nurture a research appreciative culture by various means including rewarding HSCPs with protected work time for research and national awards for research-based practice innovations, and instructing interview panels to independently examine for research knowledge and practice. At an individual level, existing research capacity could be mobilised by working more closely with Higher Education Institute researchers, and by organising national HSCP research conferences. Existing research capacity could be increased by providing training on already identified research skills deficits (e.g., applying for funding, publishing research) via preferred selected modalities (e.g., practice-based workshops) in the context of a supportive and organic environment (e.g., one-to-one mentorship, research clusters or online collaborative hubs).
Keywords:
HEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENT; HEALTH RESEARCH; ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONAL; EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND SKILLS; SURVEY
Local subject classification:
RESEARCH SKILLS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorMcHugh, Patricken
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-13T16:16:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-13T16:16:36Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-13-
dc.identifier.citationMcHugh, P. & Byrne, M. (2011). Survey of the Research Activity, Skills and Training Needs of Health and Social Care Professionals in Ireland. Dublin: Health Service Executive.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/202929-
dc.descriptionThe first of its kind, this study profiled the level of research activity among HSCPs, their research skills and training needs, and their preferences for how their research capacity could be developed. The various HSCP bodies and discipline-specific service manager groups were requested to circulate a 31-item questionnaire to their members and staff respectively. While this process attempted to distribute the survey to the total population of 14,631 HSCPs, the number reached is likely to be lower because of the absence of an overall sampling frame for HSCPs. A total of 373 HSCPs responded, representing a response rate of 2.5%. This significantly low response rate limits the generalisability of the findings to the overall HSCP population, as does the likely strong response bias towards research active HSCPs. During the period of January – June 2011, 47.5% (n=177) of participants were engaged in research. They were involved with 542 projects consisting of 192 (35.4%) service evaluations, 229 (42.3%) research projects and 121 (22.3%) review articles. Regarding their two most recent projects, 33.7% were part of gaining an academic degree and 22.7% were funded. There was a substantial degree of coordination and cooperation among the projects sampled, with 74.7% involving some form of collaboration, while one third were part of a larger research stream. These research active participants spent on average of 13% of their working time engaged in research. Eighty four per cent and 73% of research active and inactive participants respectively indicated a desire to spend more time engaged in research. Clinical pressures and a lack of time were cited as the main barriers to engaging in research. Increased protected work time for research, more funded research posts, and greater mentorship and support for researchers were cited as the most effective facilitators of research activity. Regarding participants’ research skills, the greatest areas of reported weakness were applying for funding and publishing research. Other areas highlighted as weak were that of quantitative and qualitative research design and data analysis, and applying for ethical approval. Regarding research training, participants indicated a preference for various combinations of one-to-one mentorship, peer-based learning within research clusters and practice-based workshops. Based on the findings of this survey, a number of recommendations targeted at developing the research capacity of HSCPs are presented. At a policy level, there is a need to prioritise nominating both a national and regional HSCP managerial and research leads that sit respectively on a national and regional HSCP Research Groups. At an organisational level, there is need to nurture a research appreciative culture by various means including rewarding HSCPs with protected work time for research and national awards for research-based practice innovations, and instructing interview panels to independently examine for research knowledge and practice. At an individual level, existing research capacity could be mobilised by working more closely with Higher Education Institute researchers, and by organising national HSCP research conferences. Existing research capacity could be increased by providing training on already identified research skills deficits (e.g., applying for funding, publishing research) via preferred selected modalities (e.g., practice-based workshops) in the context of a supportive and organic environment (e.g., one-to-one mentorship, research clusters or online collaborative hubs).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENTen
dc.subjectHEALTH RESEARCHen
dc.subjectALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONALen
dc.subjectEDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND SKILLSen
dc.subjectSURVEYen
dc.subject.otherRESEARCH SKILLSen
dc.titleSurvey of the research activity, skills and training needs of Health and Social Care professionals in Irelanden
dc.title.alternativePrepared by Patrick McHugh and Dr. Michael Byrne on behalf of the Health Service Executiveen
dc.typeReporten
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