Therapeutic implications of manipulating and mining the microbiota.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/201331
Title:
Therapeutic implications of manipulating and mining the microbiota.
Authors:
Shanahan, Fergus
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Clinical Science Building, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. f.shanahan@ucc.ie
Citation:
Therapeutic implications of manipulating and mining the microbiota. 2009, 587 (Pt 17):4175-9 J. Physiol. (Lond.)
Journal:
The Journal of physiology
Issue Date:
1-Sep-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/201331
DOI:
10.1113/jphysiol.2009.174649
PubMed ID:
19505978
Additional Links:
http://jp.physoc.org/content/587/17/4175.full.pdf+html; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2754358/pdf/tjp0587-4175.pdf
Abstract:
The gut microbiota is increasingly recognized as a health asset but occasionally is a contributor to the pathogenesis of both gastrointestinal and certain extra-intestinal disorders. This is driving research interest, the pace of which has been greatly facilitated by new molecular technologies for studying mixed microbial populations, including the non-cultivable sector. In addition, it appears that elements of a modern lifestyle such as diet, domestic hygiene, urbanization, antibiotic usage and family size, may represent proxy markers of environmental influence on the composition of the microbiota colonizing the host in early life. While manipulation of the microbiota has become a therapeutic strategy in certain clinical disorders, the prospect of mining host-microbe-dietary interactions for novel drug discovery may become an even more intriguing reality.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The gut microbiota is increasingly recognized as a health asset but occasionally is a contributor to the pathogenesis of both gastrointestinal and certain extra-intestinal disorders. This is driving research interest, the pace of which has been greatly facilitated by new molecular technologies for studying mixed microbial populations, including the non-cultivable sector. In addition, it appears that elements of a modern lifestyle such as diet, domestic hygiene, urbanization, antibiotic usage and family size, may represent proxy markers of environmental influence on the composition of the microbiota colonizing the host in early life. While manipulation of the microbiota has become a therapeutic strategy in certain clinical disorders, the prospect of mining host-microbe-dietary interactions for novel drug discovery may become an even more intriguing reality.
MeSH:
Animals; Humans; Intestinal Diseases; Intestines; Metagenome; Models, Biological; Probiotics
ISSN:
1469-7793

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShanahan, Fergusen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-10T15:28:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-10T15:28:27Z-
dc.date.issued2009-09-01-
dc.identifier.citationTherapeutic implications of manipulating and mining the microbiota. 2009, 587 (Pt 17):4175-9 J. Physiol. (Lond.)en
dc.identifier.issn1469-7793-
dc.identifier.pmid19505978-
dc.identifier.doi10.1113/jphysiol.2009.174649-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/201331-
dc.descriptionThe gut microbiota is increasingly recognized as a health asset but occasionally is a contributor to the pathogenesis of both gastrointestinal and certain extra-intestinal disorders. This is driving research interest, the pace of which has been greatly facilitated by new molecular technologies for studying mixed microbial populations, including the non-cultivable sector. In addition, it appears that elements of a modern lifestyle such as diet, domestic hygiene, urbanization, antibiotic usage and family size, may represent proxy markers of environmental influence on the composition of the microbiota colonizing the host in early life. While manipulation of the microbiota has become a therapeutic strategy in certain clinical disorders, the prospect of mining host-microbe-dietary interactions for novel drug discovery may become an even more intriguing reality.en
dc.description.abstractThe gut microbiota is increasingly recognized as a health asset but occasionally is a contributor to the pathogenesis of both gastrointestinal and certain extra-intestinal disorders. This is driving research interest, the pace of which has been greatly facilitated by new molecular technologies for studying mixed microbial populations, including the non-cultivable sector. In addition, it appears that elements of a modern lifestyle such as diet, domestic hygiene, urbanization, antibiotic usage and family size, may represent proxy markers of environmental influence on the composition of the microbiota colonizing the host in early life. While manipulation of the microbiota has become a therapeutic strategy in certain clinical disorders, the prospect of mining host-microbe-dietary interactions for novel drug discovery may become an even more intriguing reality.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jp.physoc.org/content/587/17/4175.full.pdf+htmlen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2754358/pdf/tjp0587-4175.pdfen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIntestinal Diseases-
dc.subject.meshIntestines-
dc.subject.meshMetagenome-
dc.subject.meshModels, Biological-
dc.subject.meshProbiotics-
dc.titleTherapeutic implications of manipulating and mining the microbiota.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Clinical Science Building, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. f.shanahan@ucc.ieen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of physiologyen
dc.description.provinceMunster-

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